Meaning of — the living daylights out of in English:

— the living daylights out of

phrase

(also US — the daylights out of)
  • Do the specified thing to (someone) with great severity.

    ‘he beat the living daylights out of them’
    • ‘he can scare the living daylights out of a cinema audience’
    • ‘it frightened the daylights out of me’
    • ‘He was employed as a ‘scary actor’ - one of the living figures who people the dungeon and scare the living daylights out of visitors.’
    • ‘He could be very funny, harshly cruel, and would use his sharp wit and temper to scare the living daylights out of paranoid politicians who had him followed in the night.’
    • ‘Thus, swearing evolved a useful purpose as a buffer between fury and the instinct to beat the living daylights out of each other.’
    • ‘These true stories of dark doings, loose ends, and unexplained terror keep us up at night, defy all reason, and scare the living daylights out of us.’
    • ‘The only reason why I didn't beat the living daylights out of Travis was because Lisa begged me not to.’
    • ‘I would take them out into the front street and beat the living daylights out of them.’
    • ‘I looked up to see a seventeen-year-old standing over me, about to beat the living daylights out of my eleven-year-old body.’
    • ‘Have I mentioned that heights scare the living daylights out of me?’
    • ‘He had a sudden urge to beat the living daylights out of Taylor.’
    • ‘I growled and tried to figure out a way to get some slack for my arms so that I could beat the living daylights out of the idiot that had hold of me.’
    • ‘So one night she hides in the cemetery and figures to scare the living daylights out of him.’
    • ‘I told him since he seemed unable to assure that my daughter would be safe in his school I'd sue the living daylights out of him, the school, the city etc.’
    • ‘"You scared the living daylights out of me, " Natalia whispered harshly.’
    • ‘"Yeah and you scare the living daylights out of me because of it.’
    • ‘She wasn't ashamed to admit he scared the living daylights out of her.’

    Origin

    From daylights meaning ‘eyes’, hence ‘any vital organ’.