Meaning of allodium in English:

allodium

Pronunciation /əˈləʊdɪəm/

nounplural noun allodia/əˈləʊdɪə/

(also allod)
historical
  • An estate held in absolute ownership, without acknowledgement to a superior.

    ‘Such castles owned as allods by important magnates were particularly common as well in the Spanish March.’
    • ‘They did exactly what a rational actor in their position should do - they would give you an allodium in exchange for the expected future value of the property taxes on your land.’
    • ‘Even property holding allodium can be confiscated by the government, should they choose, with ‘fair’ compensation to the landowner.’
    • ‘The allodium was held as an unconditional gift rather than as a fief, although the beneficiary was expected to be at the king's disposal in future military campaigns.’
    • ‘Bernhard lives in his castle Scharnstein (which is an allod), and holds the villages of Grünau and Viechtwang as fiefs from the abbey.’

Origin

Early 17th century from medieval Latin al(l)odium, used frequently in the Domesday Book, from a Germanic cognate of all + ōd ‘estate’.