Meaning of back foot in English:

back foot

Pronunciation /ˌbak ˈfʊt/

noun

  • 1The foot which is placed further back when a particular stance or posture is adopted, or when a particular action is performed. In later use often in the context of sport or dancing.

  • 2Cricket
    The foot closest to the wicket when the batsman stands at the crease. Especially in "off (also on) the back foot": with the batsman moving backwards before striking the ball; with the foot closest to the wicket bearing most of the weight of the batsman's body.

  • 3British, Australian, New Zealand "on the back foot": (originally Boxing) in a defensive position or stance; (hence figurative) at a disadvantage; on the defensive. Often in "to put (also get, catch,etc.) (a person) on the back foot" and variants: to gain an advantage over (a competitor or opponent); to get the better of (a person or group).

  • 4The lower part of one of the rear legs of a chair, table, or other object.

  • 5Usually in plural. Any of the hind feet of an animal or other organism; especially either of the hind feet of a quadruped.

adjective

Cricket
  • Designating a shot played from close to the wicket, with the foot closest to the wicket bearing most of the weight of the body.

Origin

Early 16th century; earliest use found in Gavin Douglas (c1476–1522), poet and bishop of Dunkeld. From back + foot.