Meaning of barouche in English:

barouche

Pronunciation /bəˈruːʃ/

noun

historical
  • A four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage with a collapsible hood over the rear half, a seat in front for the driver, and seats facing each other for the passengers.

    ‘The barouches, which were used by the Queen Mother, will travel north tomorrow for Royal Ascot, which this year is being held at York races.’
    • ‘Brought up in the era of the barouche and accustomed to the train, Proust was amazed by the motorcar.’
    • ‘Your cousin, it seems, has disappeared with the barouche, and I fear only God knows when - or even if - he'll return.’
    • ‘It began to rain, I had my carriage sent home so that I could accompany her in her barouche, and now, I've no means of returning to Cedar Grove.’

Origin

Early 19th century from German dialect Barutsche, from Italian baroccio, based on Latin birotus ‘two-wheeled’, from bi- ‘having two’ + rota ‘wheel’.