Main meanings of bong in English

: bong1bong2bong3

bong1

Pronunciation /bɒŋ/

See synonyms for bong on Thesaurus.com

Translate bong into Spanish

noun

  • A low-pitched, resonant sound of the kind made by a large bell.

    ‘the clock had struck the hour and it was only three bongs’
    • ‘The grandfather clock in the corner struck eleven o'clock and let out a deep bong sound.’
    • ‘Those who have to listen to the bongs and chimes of All Through the Night all through the night have had enough.’
    • ‘Depending on which band you are listening to, pan music can be raucous and noisy, a riotous volley of plinks, clangs and bongs, or it can be like notes on velvet.’
    • ‘It made a loud bong and a huge crash in the next room.’
    • ‘For a loose definition of the sound, imagine repetitive bong hits.’
    • ‘Bong! for one o'clock; bong! bong! for two o'clock, and so forth.’
    • ‘The "bongs" of Big Ben will be heard for the last time on Saturday before it falls silent for a month for maintenance work.’
    • ‘‘The Bongs’ at the beginning of the Six O'Clock News are one of the key anchors in a Radio Four listener's day.’
    • ‘The 12 bongs at midday and midnight take 54 seconds to sound.’
    • ‘Most of the time things are OK, but once a month or so I close the lid and I hear the “bong” chime of the computer restarting.’
    • ‘When Ella heard the bong of the palace clock striking, she counted the eleven strikes.’
    • ‘They made a very sonorous and resonant bong.’
    reverberation, ringing, ring, ding-dong, bong, peal, chime, toll

verb

[no object]
  • (especially of a bell) emit a low-pitched, resonant sound.

    ‘Several eyes looked at the clock, its trusty chimes bonged 3: 00.’
    • ‘Still, the prototype was completed by New Year’s Eve 1999, when it bonged twice at midnight.’
    • ‘It bonged on the hour and needed to be wound up with a special key.’
    • ‘Mike was standing under the big bell when it bonged.’
    • ‘Then one day he stuck paper clips on his guitar-strings and they bonged like gamelan bells.’
    • ‘Slightly to the left of that, there’s a single bell which has been bonging away to itself, a little lower than the others.’
    • ‘It's like my biological clock had turned into a massive grandfather clock and instead of ticking it was bonging!’
    • ‘Continue to hold down these four keys until it has ‘bonged’ a total of three times.’
    • ‘The bells have bonged at the local church and we have a bus to catch.’
    • ‘My ideal car would let me drive it as I wanted without binging and bonging at me and telling me what to do.’
    ring, ring out, chime, chime out, clang, toll

Origin

Mid 19th century imitative.

Main meanings of bong in English

: bong1bong2bong3

bong2

Pronunciation /bɒŋ/

See synonyms for bong on Thesaurus.com

Translate bong into Spanish

noun

  • A water pipe used for smoking cannabis or other drugs.

    ‘In the ten years since first trying cannabis, I have been a regular smoker of pure, high quality cannabis using water bongs, special pipes and rarely pure joints.’
    • ‘On Feb.24, federal agents raided more than 100 homes and businesses throughout the nation that sell bongs and pipes.’
    • ‘This means using bongs is a healthier smoking option in comparison to pipes and rolling papers.’
    • ‘I believe it has been proved that smoking weed on its own, especially from a bong, is more cancerous than smoking cigarettes.’
    • ‘It's believed that the epidemic in Derry is only in its early stages, thus far involving only smoking joints and making bongs out of breathing apparatus.’
    • ‘You can buy pipes, bongs, rolling machines, scales, skins etc in hundreds of shops in the UK alone, perfectly legally.’
    • ‘A used cannabis bong has been found yards away from a primary school.’
    • ‘I had never done drugs before but it was quite apparent that they were smoking marijuana with a bong.’
    • ‘One night he took a bong hit of a dried plant, and it nearly killed him.’
    • ‘Inside is a bong and a pipe, decorated in assorted colours.’
    • ‘Lisa who also stocks paraphernalia such as bongs and pipes, sells between two and four kilos of mushrooms a week.’
    • ‘He says his most popular items aren't pipes and bongs but the many pendants, pins and purses hanging in his case.’
    • ‘Drug tests don't reveal whether a student smoked one joint a month ago or takes bong hits between classes.’
    • ‘And pot users usually use bongs to filter the smoke.’
    • ‘The bong pipe, which accompanies him everywhere, stands untouched on the table.’
    • ‘It is usually mixed with tobacco and rolled into a smokable ‘joint’ or ‘spliff’, or the mixture is put into a pipe or a (often home-made) construct called a bong.’
    • ‘JJ had a six-foot-long bong fashioned out of PVC piping.’
    • ‘Were people following her or were they simply waiting for her to leave so they could pull out their stash and bongs…?’
    • ‘Inside the flat will be the usual scattering of bongs and the smell of pot or spilt bong water.’
    • ‘Joey then walked into the closet, and a few moments later, pulled out the tallest bong I had ever seen.’
    tobacco pipe, briar, briar pipe, meerschaum, clay pipe

Origin

1970s from Thai baung, literally ‘cylindrical wooden tube’.

Main meanings of bong in English

: bong1bong2bong3

bong3

Pronunciation /bɒŋ/

See synonyms for bong on Thesaurus.com

Translate bong into Spanish

noun

Climbing
  • A large piton.

    ‘Back then, if you needed a bong-bong (wide piton), you had to make it yourself.’
    • ‘Other than on routes like Excaliber, where the wide-crack predominates, bongs are rarely needed.’
    • ‘The route no longer requires the infamous "bong sandwiches" (pitons stacked against wood blocks), but it still has an eerie feel.’
    • ‘The largest of pitons are now rarely seen and are called “bongs” due to the characteristic low tone they produced.’
    • ‘But really it's the full rack of pitons (in particular the bong-bongs) that weighs you down.’

Origin

1960s probably imitative.

Pronunciation

bong

/bɒŋ/