Main meanings of bugle in English

: bugle1bugle2bugle3

bugle1

(also bugle-horn)

Pronunciation /ˈbjuːɡ(ə)l/

See synonyms for bugle on Thesaurus.com

Translate bugle into Spanish

noun

  • A brass instrument like a small trumpet, typically without valves or keys and used for military signals.

    ‘the bugle sounded the charge’
    • ‘a bugle call’
    • ‘This military role was later assumed by the bugle or trumpet in the west.’
    • ‘Deployed in open order, often across broken terrain and beyond the immediate supervision of their commanders, the manoeuvres of these soldiers were controlled by signals relayed by bugles and horns.’
    • ‘The ability to play only notes of the harmonic series is the characteristic feature of such simple instruments as the bugle or posthorn.’
    • ‘Call out the fifes, sound the bugles, strike on the drums.’
    • ‘In Winchester a single bugle player sounded the Last Post before the cathedral grounds fell silent.’
    • ‘The bugle that sounded the Charge of the Light Brigade will today be presented to the regiment that carried it into the valley where hundreds of men died.’
    • ‘Traditional musical instruments include a bugle made from buffalo horn, a circular piece of iron with a string stretched across it that vibrates to produce sound, and a drum.’
    • ‘From beyond the canyon's ridge, a wonderful bugle call charged the air, pounding hooves, belonging to the stalwart super troopers of Holt's Rangers raced to The Alamo in all their red, white and blue glory.’
    • ‘He had a weakness for everything grand, powerful and gleaming - military uniforms, brass bugles, banners and lances glinting in the sun, royal palaces and coats of arms.’
    • ‘I was on duty in the submarine lookout position when I heard the ‘double’ sounded on our bugles and I immediately ran to my action station in Q turret, midships between the two funnels.’
    • ‘While the living comrades of those buried in a New Caledonia cemetery stand at salute, a bugle sounds ‘Taps’ - voicing the promise that they have not died in vain.’
    • ‘It can be ranked with the trumpet, the bugle, and the drum as a military instrument.’
    • ‘With the deep tones of a bugle signalling the end of the remembrance service in the background, Emmett said in a trembling voice that his journey back to the camp brought closure for him.’
    • ‘There is just less than half an hour of music, beginning with an introductory movement depicting dawn at a tranquil camp of Confederate troops, broken by the Assembly bugle calls and the march north.’
    • ‘He was awoken before dawn by the strange lilting sound of Ottoman bugles, and after prayers and a breakfast of melons he set off behind the Mutawwif towards the Sacred Mosque.’
    • ‘Now we have barracks for the soldiers but the bugle is an extremely important instrument for our regiment and we like to carry on the tradition.’
    • ‘The bugle was essential to all military communication until its displacement by electronics.’
    • ‘In Lancashire, the bugle sounded at the stroke of midday as riders and hunt followers toasted the Holcombe Hunt with a drop of brandy or port.’
    • ‘For years, Mason led Star of Indiana, a world champion drum and bugle corps.’
    • ‘By the end of the Civil War the artillery, cavalry, and infantry were sounding bugle calls.’

verb

[no object]
  • 1Sound a bugle.

    ‘In fact, in response to George's protests, the first confederate, Henry Longshackle, began bugling even more loudly.’
    • ‘Until the mid-1800s, the best technology was shouting, bugling, or messengers on foot or on horseback.’
    • ‘All day long, upon the grass-grown ramparts of the town practising soldiers trumpeted and bugled; all day long, down in angles of dry trenches, practising soldiers drummed and drummed.’
    1. 1.1with object Sound (a note or call) on a bugle.
      ‘he bugled a warning’
      • ‘Sharp notes fill the afternoon like gun smoke as Mr. Fish bugles the students back on the bus.’
      • ‘Gunga Din was climbing the tower to bugle a warning and the Scottish bagpipers were on the way.’
      • ‘Thanks to the sailor who bugled a tune for the group as well as the several songs we heard over the radio.’

Origin

Middle English via Old French from Latin buculus, diminutive of bos ‘ox’. The early English sense was ‘wild ox’, hence the compound bugle-horn, denoting the horn of an ox used to give signals, originally in hunting.

Main meanings of bugle in English

: bugle1bugle2bugle3

bugle2

Pronunciation /ˈbjuːɡ(ə)l/

See synonyms for bugle on Thesaurus.com

Translate bugle into Spanish

noun

mass noun
  • A creeping Eurasian plant of the mint family, with blue flowers held on upright stems.

    Genus Ajuga, family Labiatae: several species, especially the common A. reptans

    ‘You can even plant periwinkle, bugle and ground ivy in the gaps in your log or rock pile - this could make a fun project for an older child.’
    • ‘Primrose, cowslip, lady's mantle, bugle, thrift, clustered bellflower are widely available in garden centres, but are all natives.’
    • ‘We found some, but not the great swathes that we had hoped for, although we were rewarded by plenty of patches of bluebells, drifts of wood anemones, a glade with masses of milkmaids and lots of primroses, cowslips and violas and bugle.’

Origin

Middle English from late Latin bugula.

Main meanings of bugle in English

: bugle1bugle2bugle3

bugle3

Pronunciation /ˈbjuːɡ(ə)l/

See synonyms for bugle on Thesaurus.com

Translate bugle into Spanish

noun

  • An ornamental tube-shaped glass or plastic bead sewn on to clothing.

    ‘Sophie's more casual outfit consists of a black Powerline stretch sleeveless top, Kismet's own label sarong, and an orange, multi-strand bugle bead bracelet.’
    • ‘Towering stilettos from Sergio Rossi or Diego Dolcini are studded with Swarovski crystals, bugle beads or paillettes, often on luxurious fabrics such as satin or even alpaca.’
    • ‘She believes in shimmer in bridal wear and embellishes the line with bugle beads, gold thread, sequins, embroidery, weave and print to create an almost futuristic look.’
    • ‘On the cover of our December issue, Gwyneth Paltrow is wearing a beautiful satin/silk, bugle-beaded Ralph Lauren collection gown.’
    • ‘It was made out of black polyester that looked very much like silk, floor length, with a kind of cowl neck, cut low to the back with straps fanning out across the back and bugle beading at the hips and collar.’

Origin

Late 16th century of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

bugle

/ˈbjuːɡ(ə)l/