Main meanings of bung in English

: bung1bung2bung3

bung1

Pronunciation /bʌŋ/

See synonyms for bung

Translate bung into Spanish

noun

  • A stopper for closing a hole in a container.

    ‘His invention was designed to cut a hole through an existing bung or stopper rather than through the oak barrel head.’
    • ‘On a thirsty day, unscrupulous carters were known to extract a free drink from a keg of porter by boring a small hole through the bung, inserting a goose quill and sucking some of the contents.’
    • ‘A barrel is made up of staves shaped into a bulging cylinder, with hoops round it, a flat circular head at either end, and at least one hole for a bung.’
    • ‘If you're using a barrel, use a silicone or rubber bung with a hole in the center for an airlock that fits the barrel's opening.’
    • ‘The bung was pressed into the hole to seal it, and the shaft removed.’
    • ‘The mayor was taken on a site tour of the operation, by John Keeling, Brewing Director, where he saw the art of brewing and even tapped bungs into shives.’
    • ‘Vessels were sealed with silicone rubber bungs.’
    • ‘The minirhizotron tubes were sealed with rubber bungs.’
    • ‘A piece of the leather bung which plugged one of these was still there, though the design I had seen on it the last time had disappeared.’
    • ‘There's also a pretty cool looking power button and a modem socket covered by a rubber bung.’
    • ‘You just turn the taps on if you want a bath, and if you want a shower you push a rubber bung into the tap spout, and the water is diverted up into the shower.’
    • ‘I took a bung out of one of the drums and looked inside, and it was all black, and not a golden colour like it should have been.’
    • ‘Each flask was sealed with a foam bung and foil cap, and placed on an orbital shaker at 135 rpm.’
    • ‘It's secured to the frame of the panel by small black plastic bungs which look ok, but some may have preferred metal.’
    • ‘The latter is covered with a rubber bung that's nice and snug out of the box, but becomes too loose to be of use once you've uncorked it.’
    • ‘He removed all the bungs that he could free with a hammer and a screwdriver, then knocked over a half full drum of benzene.’
    • ‘A sterile disposable needle was fixed to the syringe, the air in it expelled carefully without causing aerosols and the needle capped with a sterile rubber bung.’
    • ‘The bottom of the tube was fitted with a rubber bung.’
    • ‘Each vessel was fitted with a rubber bung to accommodate the shoot base and electrodes and to minimize re-oxygenation of the medium by the atmosphere.’
    • ‘Not only does this placement of the connector make it more difficult to plug in an antenna, but it also leaves you with a small plastic bung lying around that you're bound to lose.’
    stopper, plug, cork, spigot, spile, seal, cap, top, lid, cover
    View synonyms

verb

[with object]
  • 1Close with a stopper.

    ‘the casks are bunged before delivery’
    • ‘They phoned West Wiltshire Housing Society which sent someone out to mend the damaged wires and bung up the hole into the attic but the squirrels were not deterred and more got in through a gap from their neighbour's house.’
    • ‘In the mean time, until the hole is bunged, Slemko recommends that customers not access the Web site.’
    • ‘Additionally, the Feds sought assurance that the patches MS has issued are adequate to bung the holes without causing problems for the machines they're installed on.’
    • ‘If the hacker has a conscience - and most do - he will notify the victim and give them a few weeks to bung the hole before publishing his findings on the Web and getting the credit he deserves.’
    1. 1.1bung something upBlock something.
      ‘you let vegetable peelings bung the sink up’
      • ‘I feel light headed, my ears are bunged up and my balance feels hazy.’
      • ‘It has three different sized grating thingies and the picture on the box very clearly shows it grating cheese, which puts a stop to the n'er-do-wells warning me that cheese would bung it up.’
      • ‘One fine day it gets bunged up: and there you are.’

Phrases

    bung it on
    Australian informal
    • Affect a style of speech or behaviour that is pretentious or ostentatious.

      • ‘Georgie knew them well enough to know they were just bunging it on’
      • ‘Does that jerk really have an ocker accent, or is he just bunging it on for effect?’
      • ‘The hairdresser is only bunging it on to get the physical attention of the town's amorous farm wives.’
      • ‘At first I thought they were 'bunging it on', but quickly realized that was how they treated each other.’
      • ‘"Shirley's only bunging it on to get attention," she said dismissively.’
      • ‘Rose began to realize that half the time the old girl was bunging it on.’

Origin

Late Middle English from Middle Dutch bonghe (noun).

Main meanings of bung in English

: bung1bung2bung3

bung2

Pronunciation /bʌŋ/

See synonyms for bung

Translate bung into Spanish

verb

informal British with object and adverbial of direction
  • Put or throw (something) somewhere in a careless or casual way.

    • ‘fill out the reply-paid card and bung it in the post’
    • ‘And then, one who stares at a computer terminal for hours together would not be hard-pressed to market a ‘dancing bindi’ and bung in an application package for the same.’
    • ‘Better cook a steak at home and bung some oven chips under the grill.’
    • ‘In other words, the factories have the proper machinery and simply bung out an extra 100 pairs a week.’
    • ‘When I sing, people want to bung the closest brick at me.’
    • ‘When we stopped at Asda we bunged him in a proper shopping trolley which he proceeded to try to wrench himself out of by the arms.’
    • ‘I bunged everything into black plastic bin liners, sealed them for ‘freshness’, washed the mattress, cut up what he had been using for a ground sheet, fitted it to the floor of the van and left the van doors open for the rest of the day.’
    • ‘And if you're a good wee boy we'll see if we can bung you some more dosh when the Scottish block gets fixed in a few weeks' time.’
    • ‘But I'll bung some in anyway, it brightens up the page.’
    • ‘Now I know how to pluralise a remarkable number of nouns (you can't just bung an ‘s’ on the end of a word).’
    • ‘And if I promised you a link weeks ago but have still not delivered then sorry but please bung me an email and I'll sort things out.’
    • ‘As little as five years later, you might actually be able to afford one - especially if your government, starting to really panic about climate change, bungs you a subsidy.’
    • ‘Intel's Pentium 4 Extreme Edition is aimed fairly and squarely at desktops for gamers, but that hasn't stopped a US PC maker from attempting to bung one into its high-end portables.’
    • ‘Bung me on Brunswick Street in a Christmas shopping rush and all of a sudden I'm leading the fashion stakes among teens.’
    • ‘Personally, I would bung a few of them into stocks in the town square, and make sure that the public of this country really do know who these people are, but we apparently - regrettably, in some cases - have moved on from those times.’
    • ‘Toning will also make your skin much more receptive to the moisturiser you should be bunging onto your skin, making just the smallest amount needed for super soft skin.’
    • ‘I had grilled her over the recipe and she told me that it was as simple as bunging together some leeks, potatoes and water and voila.’
    • ‘Deeply and sincerely, when it all got too sensitive, he would bung on an Aussie accent and we'd laugh.’
    • ‘Yes it's that time of year again, the time when Big Brother starts and Channel 4 bung God a few quid to make it sunny in order to encourage semi-nudity (it's true honestly, we've seen the internal memo).’
    • ‘Made to an old family recipe in the mountains of Bavaria, Glhwein has been lovingly prepared by red - cheeked men in lederhosen so that all you have to do is bung it in a saucepan, warm it up and slug it down.’
    • ‘If anyone rich reads this, can they please bung me some money so I can take her away for a short holiday?’

noun

informal British
  • A bribe.

    • ‘I know I'm not the only one to have stopped supporting animal welfare groups, so ultimately these groups will lose power as their donation base shrinks and they can no longer afford million pound bungs to the parliamentary Labour party.’
    • ‘The real Licensee isn't monikered thus because he owns a bar, but because he's alleged to have a licence to operate in the city, through judicious bungs and threats to police and politicians.’
    • ‘House-price control is also naive because there are so many ways round it, from free cars, holidays, insurance and moving expenses to bungs in offshore accounts.’
    • ‘‘We've not had any bungs or better money than anyone else,’ he said.’
    • ‘Whether it's pitch battles, boardroom corruption, manager's bungs or ticket tout scandals, the whole league stinks of sleaze.’
    • ‘He takes bungs in return for sick notes and unnecessary drug prescriptions.’
    • ‘Yet in a world notorious for bungs, Stephens has a reputation for straight dealing and honesty.’
    • ‘Football is dominated by money, takeovers, shares, bungs and tap-ups.’
    • ‘In his time he has been accused of taking bungs for transfers, and once gave an over-enthusiastic fan a clip round the ear for invading the pitch.’
    • ‘Football is not unused to unscrupulous behaviour, including Far East gambling scams, players prepared to fix matches, agents ready to give and managers to take six-figure bungs.’
    • ‘He says at the end of the meeting another man, whom Gilmartin didn't recognise, collared him and asked for an outrageous bung.’
    • ‘And those who pay bungs and benefit from them are not just agents, they are often club officials, who obviously don't want greater scrutiny or transparency.’
    • ‘However, the faces were there, slab-sided, sleek of hair, the secrets of their mysterious bungs and bank accounts locked behind monochrome eyes.’
    • ‘Although he knew of the bung to Burke, he appeared to accept Murphy's denial that it had anything to do with JMSE, despite the fact that the payment made by its former chairman, Jim Gogarty, came from the company's accounts.’
    • ‘What other construction is capable of being put on his words, other than ‘Seamie got a bung from the Micker’?’
    • ‘There is a distinct whiff of bung hanging around Old Trafford today, as rumours that Diego Forlan was way over priced for his move to Salford's finest.’
    • ‘The Clough Years were subsequently tainted with bung allegations.’
    • ‘However after being sacked from Highbury for the whole bung scenario the Scot made a shock return to North London in 1998 replacing Christian Gross as Spurs manager.’
    • ‘I shall write this article without much mention of the bung allegations, as I am looking to discuss quality.’
    • ‘In an age of extraordinary venality such as our own, when the government is only a facilitator of commerce, artists come under a great deal of general contempt, as if every single soul must become bung fodder for greed.’

Origin

Early 19th century symbolic; the noun sense dates from the 1950s.

Main meanings of bung in English

: bung1bung2bung3

bung3

Pronunciation /bʌŋ/

See synonyms for bung

Translate bung into Spanish

adjective

Australian, New Zealand
  • 1informal Broken down, ruined, or useless.

    • ‘As the people downstairs had absented themselves to a haven of fresh air somewhere, we were unable to inform them of this bung fuse and therefore unable to rectify the situation.’
    • ‘All I can say is that my business partners have a sore shoulder, a screwy leg, a skin infection; and I am nursing a bung knee.’
    • ‘Latham won the running race, while McManus ended up with a bung leg.’
    • ‘It wasn't so long ago that I told off the Nats for having a bung site.’
    • ‘Such clarity comes at a cost: a bung ear, some ugly scarring - and the inevitable life lesson.’
    • ‘Marg said it looked pretty crook, it had a bung eye, a bung wing and a bung leg.’
    • ‘Mick used the bung method shown to him by local Northampton angler Spencer Kimton.’
    • ‘My email is going a tad bung at the moment, as is my whole computer.’
    • ‘Today I did a walking tour and now I have two bung knees.’
    • ‘Except for the gym which I have joined to circumnavigate both my bung shin (which is getting less bung I'm pleased to report) and winter.’
  • 2informal, dated Dead.

    • ‘In parts of Australia, in New South Wales and Queensland, the word "bung" is an aboriginal word meaning ‘dead.’’

Phrases

    go bung
    Australian, New Zealand informal
    • 1Break down; fail or go bankrupt.

      • ‘This tank doesn't have CO2 and no heaters to go bung.’
      • ‘My career goes bung.’
      • ‘Gee I hope the tube isn't going bung!’
      • ‘According to the opposition, the economy is about to go bung, and the streets will soon be full of former merchant bankers holding signs that say ‘will lick paths clean for food.’’
      • ‘The left one went bung earlier in the year, and has not mended as expected (and a cataract has formed), so she's doing it pretty hard, and so is Dad.’
      • ‘The slide projector – who on Earth uses slides nowadays?! – went bung and Bordwell fielded a few questions from the audience.’
    • 2Die.

      • ‘The word found its way into nineteenth-century Australian pidgin, where the phrase to go bung meant ‘to die’.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (originally Australian pidgin): from Yagara (an extinct Aboriginal language).

Pronunciation

bung

/bʌŋ/