Main meanings of burton in English

: burton1burton2

burton1

Pronunciation /ˈbəːt(ə)n/

Translate burton into Spanish

noun

‘And there's where rule Number Three went for a burton.’
  • ‘My CD player has gone for a burton; I don't know what on earth is wrong with it.’
  • ‘Cardiff's unbeaten start was not the only record to go for a burton.’
  • ‘Someone would say ‘Bill Smith went for a burton last night’.’
  • ‘This weekend's long run has gone for a burton courtesy of a trip to the Azores tomorrow.’

Phrases

    go for a burton
    British informal
    • Meet with disaster; be ruined, destroyed, or killed.

      • ‘his boat would cut mine in two and I'd go for a burton’

Origin

Second World War (originally RAF slang): perhaps referring to Burton ale, from Burton upon Trent.

Main meanings of burton in English

: burton1burton2

burton2

(also burton-tackle)

Pronunciation /ˈbəːt(ə)n/

Translate burton into Spanish

noun

historical
  • A light two-block tackle for hoisting.

    ‘‘A burton-tackle to the chess tree,’ he called, loud and clear.’
    • ‘Gilliatt had barely time to seize the burton tackle.’
    • ‘From each steel cap at the apex two steel cables led to the enormous 16-sheave burton tackle whose pendant was geared at 8000-to-1 ratio to a 5-horsepower electric motor winch.’
    • ‘The shrouds and back-stays are first cast off, and the mast-head got as far forward as nearly to touch the fore-part of the partners, by the runners and tackles or burtons of the mizenmast.’

Origin

Early 18th century alteration of Middle English Breton tackle, a nautical term in the same (see Breton).