Meaning of chlorine in English:

chlorine

(also Cl)

Pronunciation /ˈklɔːriːn/

Translate chlorine into Spanish

noun

mass noun
  • The chemical element of atomic number 17, a toxic, irritant, pale green gas.

    A member of the halogen group, chlorine occurs in nature mainly as sodium chloride in seawater and salt deposits. The gas was used as a poison gas in the First World War. Chlorine is added to water supplies as a disinfectant

    ‘The blue was fading to a dull chlorine green, the fuchsia sprouting roots of over an inch.’
    • ‘The green chlorine gas rolled over the Allied frontline and it created panic.’
    • ‘Once chlorine has combined with other chemicals it is not effective as a disinfectant.’
    • ‘In table salt, sodium atoms donate one electron each to chlorine atoms, making the sodiums positively charged ions and the chlorines negatively charged ions (called chloride).’
    • ‘The anion that is left behind is a cluster of carbon, chlorine, and boron atoms.’
    • ‘Bacteria are very sensitive to chemical disinfectants such as chlorine and iodine.’
    • ‘In the preceding example the aluminum has a valency of three and the chlorine has a valency of one.’
    • ‘A lifeguard dove into the greenish chlorine filled water and lifted Hope out of the pool.’
    • ‘It's just that the doctor had ordered against this because the chlorine could hurt her eye.’
    • ‘It said the chlorine leaked from a leftover tank that hadn't been sealed off completely, the agency said.’
    • ‘I love the smell of the chlorine in the morning, and the way the water sounds when it rushes pass my ears.’
    • ‘And my eyes don't feel like they are on fire with the chlorine getting in them.’
    • ‘Daniel stopped swimming for a second, he looked up and rubbed his eyes free of the chlorine that was burning his eyes.’
    • ‘Rinse shampoo out of your hair thoroughly and wash and condition it well after swimming in a chlorine filled pool.’
    • ‘Once in the upper atmosphere, the energy from the Sun causes the chlorine to be released.’
    • ‘Right now, the chlorine in the pool keeps Crocker's hair from growing past his ears.’
    • ‘Usually it's brittle from all the chlorine at the pool, and flat from wearing a woolly hat, but now it's blow dried and bouncy.’
    • ‘The only other ongoing upkeep necessary is the monitoring of the chlorine balance every couple of days.’
    • ‘As chlorine is a bleaching agent, this may also have effects on the health of your hair and skin.’
    • ‘She kissed him, tasting the chlorine from the pool and the ice tea that he had been sipping.’

Origin

Early 19th century named by Sir Humphrey Davy, from Greek khlōros ‘green’ + -ine.