Meaning of expressionist in English:

expressionist

Pronunciation /ɪkˈsprɛʃ(ə)nɪst/ /ɛkˈsprɛʃ(ə)nɪst/

Translate expressionist into Spanish

noun

  • A painter, writer, or composer who is an exponent of expressionism, seeking to express through their work the inner world of emotion rather than external reality.

    ‘the American abstract expressionist, Jackson Pollock’
    • ‘Earlier expressionists turned to tribal art to find the inspiration to distort the body in ways that could convey modern despair and agony.’
    • ‘"Even my parents still see the profession of my choice as a strange one although they saw my talent as a child," the expressionist told the reporter at his exhibition.’
    • ‘Expressionists seek to capture the essence of the real.’
    • ‘He felt that it was with a kind of desperate bravery that the abstract expressionists attempted to give us future possibilities of movement embedded in a canvas of here and now.’
    • ‘From 1912, he was associated with progressive German painters, although he was never a true Expressionist.’

Expressionists characteristically reject traditional ideas of beauty or harmony and use distortion, exaggeration, and other non-naturalistic devices in order to express emotional states. The paintings of El Greco and Grünewald exemplify expressionism in this broad sense, but the term is also used of a late 19th and 20th century European and specifically German movement tracing its origins to Van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and James Ensor, which insisted on the primacy of the artist's feelings and mood, often incorporating violence and the grotesque

adjective

  • Relating to expressionism or its exponents.

    ‘he placed emphasis on an expressionist style’
    • ‘an exhibition of abstract expressionist paintings’
    • ‘He believes the rift between modern and traditional architects originated with abstract expressionist painting.’
    • ‘He developed a heavy, austere Expressionist style, which he displayed in peasant scenes, landscapes, still-lifes, and interiors.’
    • ‘Even artists who sought a new and hard realism, kept a good deal of Expressionist distortion and exaggeration in their work.’
    • ‘His metal sculpture paralleled the work of the Abstract Expressionist painters.’
    • ‘Many of his paintings were large, with allegorical overtones, typically painted in a vigorous Expressionist style.’

Expressionists characteristically reject traditional ideas of beauty or harmony and use distortion, exaggeration, and other non-naturalistic devices in order to express emotional states. The paintings of El Greco and Grünewald exemplify expressionism in this broad sense, but the term is also used of a late 19th and 20th century European and specifically German movement tracing its origins to Van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and James Ensor, which insisted on the primacy of the artist's feelings and mood, often incorporating violence and the grotesque