Meaning of finnesko in English:

finnesko

Pronunciation /ˈfɪnəskəʊ/

nounfinnesko

  • A boot of tanned reindeer skin with the hair on the outside.

    ‘‘Skis, or at least snowshoes,’ Ayres writes, ‘should have been mandatory on the expedition, as they distribute one's weight over a much larger area than a pair of feet in finnesko.’’
    • ‘Clearly, there's no shortage of readers eager to hitch a sledge-ride into the lost world of pemmican, finnesko, man-hauling and hoosh, satisfyingly sealed off in time by the jagged crevasse of World War I.’
    • ‘Finnesko boots were stuffed with saennegrass (a crinkly, Arctic grass) for insulation.’
    • ‘The ordinary finnesko is made from the skin of the reindeer stag's head, with the fur outside, and its shape is roughly that of a very large boot without any laces.’
    • ‘They pulled worn finnesko from trash piles and stitched them together or made them from tattered discarded sleeping bags.’

Origin

Late 19th century from Norwegian finnsko, from Finn (see Finn) + sko (see shoe).