Main meanings of Georgian in English

: Georgian1Georgian2Georgian3

Georgian1

adjective

  • 1Of or characteristic of the reigns of the British Kings George I–IV (1714–1830).

    • ‘Historians know it too as the home of Tudor kingmakers, of Georgian kings and of the artists who followed in their train.’
    • ‘Whig historiography was to sideline the Georgian court; instead, Parliament was seen as the Crown's dominant partner after the Glorious Revolution.’
    • ‘If the railways marked the difference between Georgian and Victorian cities then the car has surely differentiated post-Victorian cities from their predecessors.’
    • ‘The walk will be led by two authentically dressed Georgian characters, and there will be readings and stories galore.’
    • ‘This fine example of seventeenth-century Mughal court engraving set in a late Georgian jewel was sold for 1,181,250 [pounds sterling] last year.’
    • ‘The property, which dates back to mediaeval times, once consisted of houses based on ancient timber frames with a brick façade added during the Georgian period.’
    • ‘The advertisement shows that gentleman officers in the Georgian period desired to replicate their permanent homes while in the field and would go to any expense to maintain their station in life.’
    • ‘In passing, Pen's story offers a panorama of the changing Regency, Georgian, Williamite, and Victorian ages.’
    • ‘Early 19th-century London, with its Georgian underworld of body snatchers, spirit shops and tippling houses, is vividly rendered.’
    • ‘Early chapters chronicle the origins of these areas through to Georgian and Victorian times.’
    • ‘These are the countries of Gulliver's Travels, Swift's satire on Georgian society.’
    • ‘The Fair features more than 50 actors who will recreate life in Georgian times including an encampment of Redcoats in the town's memorial gardens, birds of prey displays, a magic show and street theatre.’
    • ‘When New Walk was created in York in the 1730s, it quickly became the venue of choice for well-heeled Georgian ladies and gentlemen to pursue their new pastime - walking.’
    • ‘One had to be in full Georgian costume, which made it a splendid affair - the elegant gowns and the finery of the gentlemen gave members of the public waiting outside fantastic photo opportunities.’
    • ‘Now, it conjures up Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian evenings around the ‘instrument’, with everyone taking a turn.’
    • ‘The show traced the development of the prison from Georgian times through to the early and late Victorian periods and explained how the treatment of prisoners differed during different times.’
    • ‘British chronology is reckoned in royal reigns; epochs of history are named after kings and queens: the Elizabethan, Georgian, Victorian or Edwardian ages.’
    • ‘It is easy to imagine yourself back in Georgian times as you stroll through the city's handsome streets.’
    • ‘Houses built after 1840, which are Victorian houses, are frequently described as Georgian.’
    • ‘Visitors will be able to see many of the Royal Navy's most modern warships and step back in time in the heritage area where the great ages of seafaring from Tudor to Georgian.’
    1. 1.1Relating to British architecture of the Georgian period, characterized by restrained elegance and the use of neoclassical styles.
      • ‘As a result, the cottages echo the hotel's classical Georgian architecture, but vernacular details such as clapboard siding and wood porches are also evident.’
      • ‘When Old Town's residential neighborhood devolved into a slum, the city planners laid out New Town in the elegant Georgian style of the late 18th century.’
      • ‘Liverpool has more listed buildings than any British city outside London and more Georgian architecture than Bath.’
      • ‘The present church building was built in 1831 in a tropical variation of the Georgian architectural style.’
      • ‘The mansion that is a paradigm example of Georgian architecture is bordered by archaic gardens that cover more than an acre of land.’
      • ‘His large Georgian style mansion was furnished with a mixture of local and imported furniture.’
      • ‘In 1831, the town centre was rebuilt, and much of the resulting Georgian architecture remains intact.’
      • ‘The elegant Georgian convent buildings, including a neo-classical chapel dating from 1769, are steeped in history.’
      • ‘The symmetrical, redbrick building with its large windows and pleasing Georgian aesthetic, presents a challenge to the twenty-first-century visitor.’
      • ‘What is particularly interesting is that a Georgian building previously stood on the site and was demolished to make way for the present Victorian one.’
      • ‘On King Street, until reclamation the river frontage, a C12 timber-framed structure survives among the predominantly Georgian buildings.’
      • ‘In the following centuries the romantic ruins of Laugharne castle became the backdrop for a magnificent Georgian and Victorian garden, recreated using exclusively Victorian flowers and plants.’
      • ‘Garvin traces the history of design from the medieval style of the seventeenth century through the Georgian style of the eighteenth century to the Federal style at its end.’
      • ‘Old Town has changed a lot but Highworth still retains its Georgian character.’
      • ‘Project organisers hope the code will eventually produce the kind of character that the Georgian city of Bath is regarded to have captured so successfully.’
      • ‘‘While the plan lends itself to modern designs, these will be respectful to the Georgian character of the city,’ he said.’
      • ‘He has brought back furniture that is in keeping with the building's character, returning it to its original Georgian splendour.’
      • ‘All the Georgian and Tudor buildings I hardly knew existed have been revealed.’
      • ‘At the other end of the scale there are plasterers and restorers who are working in the Georgian tradition and have restored many 18th century ceilings and even produced very creditable replicas.’
      • ‘This detailed consideration of London during the eighteenth century proves that the dominance of Georgian classicism and fine craftsmanship is more notional than factual.’
  • 2Of or characteristic of the reigns of the British Kings George V and VI (1910–52).

    ‘As early as 1924, Georgian organizations were founded in San Francisco and in New York City.’
    1. 2.1Relating to British literature of 1910–20, in particular pastoral poetry of a type strongly attacked by the early modernists.
      • ‘Some critics accuse Hyde of producing ‘dreamlike’ poetry that never really rises above the tinkle of Georgian verse.’
      • ‘It seems to me he was too self-consciously imitative of his patrons in the Georgian poetry movement.’
      • ‘Thus, Clarissa enacts the succession from Stuart theatrics to the Georgian novel.’
      • ‘He seems to have succumbed to the conventional wisdom, for instance portraying the Georgian poets as pastoralists and ignoring their rebellion against syrupy Victorianism.’
      • ‘Her poems are notable for a restraint of expression combined with a powerful and passionate content which distinguish her from many of her Georgian contemporaries.’
      • ‘He is one of the great Georgian poets and, with Wilfred Owen, perhaps the best of the war.’
      • ‘During the 1920s and 30s he was the leader of a clique of Georgian writers, who, violently opposed by Bloomsbury and the Sitwells, were christened the Squirearchy.’
      • ‘They consigned Elgar's music to the same rubbish-bin as the minor poetry of the Edwardian and Georgian era.’
      • ‘He met a young English poet who told O'Connor that he too had called to pay his respects because Russell was ‘quite an interesting minor Georgian poet’.’
      • ‘Over the next decade, she changed from a Georgian versifier to a fine contemporary poet, largely by her own efforts, long before the days of creative writing classes.’

Pronunciation

Georgian

/ˈdʒɔːdʒ(ə)n/

Main meanings of Georgian in English

: Georgian1Georgian2Georgian3

Georgian2

adjective

  • Relating to the country of Georgia, its people, or their language.

    • ‘Every endeavour should be made to get an interpreter in the Georgian language to assist the applicant to understand the proceedings on that day.’
    • ‘The Georgian language features a frequent recurrence of the sounds ts, ds, thz, kh, khh, gh.’
    • ‘Adjarians speak the Gurian dialect of the Georgian language.’
    • ‘Russian soldiers began to withdraw from Georgian territory in 2000, and in 1999 he inaugurated an oil pipeline from Azerbaijan.’
    • ‘The Georgian communists did not relish Moscow's suggestion that Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaizhan should be amalgamated.’
    • ‘By September 1993, after intensive fighting, Georgian forces were defeated and expelled from the region.’
    • ‘Liberal use of such flavourings is characteristic of Georgian cuisine generally.’
    • ‘The characteristic feature of Georgian folk music is polyphony.’
    • ‘After this traumatic period, any disagreement or conflict between the political entities is strongly linked with the possibility of violence in the minds of Georgian citizens.’
    • ‘In response, South Ossetia's leadership upped the ante by announcing preparations to defend their unrecognized republic against a supposed Georgian invasion.’
    • ‘Considering that Georgian border forces are not prepared to fully perform the assigned missions, this creates serious difficulties in ensuring Russia's security.’
    • ‘Even in decay, and after much destruction, the Georgian capital is still rich in architectural moments’
    • ‘I was involved in the drafting of one early version of the Georgian constitution.’
    • ‘Just days earlier a Georgian patrol boat had fired at a civilian vessel in the Black Sea.’
    • ‘He scored a major success in May by peacefully driving out the strongman of another wayward Georgian region, Adjaria, and bringing it back under central government control.’
    • ‘The Georgian side is insisting on an early withdrawal of Russian military facilities from the country's territory.’
    • ‘The car crashed into a Renault minibus with Georgian registration plates.’
    • ‘In reality, however, the centralized structure of Georgian universities prevents the development of strong academic leadership.’
    • ‘Just before intermission, Georgian dancers in crimson hats and tunics perform with stirring exuberance, reminding us that earthbound entertainment can also thrill.’
    • ‘There are Greek, Georgian, and Arabic translations of the legend, but it became most widely known in Europe through a Latin version in the 11th and 12th centuries.’

noun

  • 1A native or inhabitant of Georgia, or a person of Georgian descent.

    • ‘Some national elites, especially the Chechens, Azeris and Georgians, accuse the country of fomenting the conflicts and of destabilizing the region.’
    • ‘According to traditional Georgian accounts, Georgians are descendants of Thargamos, the great-grandson of Japhet, son of the Biblical Noah.’
    • ‘Exposed to modern European ideas of nationalism under Russian tutelage, Georgians began calling for greater Georgian independence.’
    • ‘Many Georgians harkened back to the early days of the national movement in the 1980s that were motivated by civil demands and did not take part in the violence of the 1990s.’
    • ‘Some Georgians are also worried that civil wars in neighboring nations might spill over into their country.’
    • ‘His party switch had seemed ludicrous at the time, as any Georgian with a trace of political awareness knew a Democrat-run Peach State was a tenet of natural law.’
    • ‘I hope that by now you have a better idea of how it was that this simple Georgian could have captured so much power for himself in the two years before Lenin's death.’
    • ‘Molotov writes how women used to throw themselves at this golden eyed Georgian with his black hair.’
    • ‘The 30-year old Georgian, though, is too long in the tooth to be fazed by such criticism, and is raring to get back into the scoring habit.’
    • ‘For Russians and for Georgians, this coast has been emotionally ‘theirs’, the place of long, delicious summers far from mud and snow and bureaucracy.’
    • ‘Its crew of 18 Russians, two Romanians and two Georgians are in jail awaiting a court hearing.’
    • ‘Other reasons were poor roads and abysmal vehicle maintenance and, according to some Russian citizens, the high car-ownership among Georgians.’
    • ‘In 1997, Georgians and Bulgarians were the first to leave.’
    • ‘The U.S. is also open to the possibility of a Russian-Georgian military operation in the gorge - an option the Georgians have been resisting.’
    • ‘Whereas Georgians particularly like maize and Azerbaijanis favour rice, Armenians use a lot of burghul (cracked wheat), notably in their plov dishes.’
    • ‘These moves are encouraging to many Georgians, who say that the country needs to establish the right ‘pressure gradient’ in its foreign policy.’
    • ‘After the Soviet Union was dissolved in September 1991, the Abkhazians were involved in an armed conflict with the Georgians, a neighboring ethnic group.’
    • ‘The Georgians are here in force, as well as the Belorussians - two countries which have suffered from similar governance to Ukraine's.’
    • ‘Georgia, called Sakartvelo by Georgians, is a European country occupying about 27,000 square miles (69,700 square kilometers).’
  • 2mass noun The official language of Georgia, spoken by around 4 million people. It is the main member of the small South Caucasian (or Kartvelian) language family, and has its own alphabet.

    • ‘The majority language is Georgian, which belongs to the Kartvelian language group.’
    • ‘The official language is Georgian, but Russian is used as a second language.’
    • ‘They had to think about what might happen if they were seen to be encouraging the overthrow of those in power in the ethnic minority regions, where many people don't speak Georgian - in the Armenian area, for instance.’
    • ‘Kancheli places the tape player so far back it's difficult to tell if the language is Latin or Georgian.’
    • ‘Furthermore, I do not speak Hebrew or Georgian, and I believe a lot has been lost in the creation of Late Marriage's English subtitles.’
    • ‘He speaks Georgian, although he had to learn Russian as well.’
    • ‘The dialogue skitters from Georgian to French, the family having grown up with both, with France esteemed as the zenith of intelligence and culture.’
    • ‘Mikoyan's son, who was present at several of these banquets, recalls that Stalin would occasionally say some words in Georgian that meant ‘a fresh tablecloth’.’
    • ‘Adjarians have no trouble in understanding or speaking standard Georgian.’
    • ‘Someone shouted out in Georgian, the words echoing off the walls.’
    • ‘Razmadze wrote the first textbooks in Georgian on analysis and integral calculus.’
    • ‘Although it has borrowed many words from Arabic, Turkic, Persian, and Russian, Georgian has remained distinctive.’
    • ‘A large platter of pilaf was set in the center of the table, and the girls placed upon it skewer after skewer of mtsvadi, as shish-kebab is properly called in Georgian.’
    • ‘Like Berezhkov, Beria knew both English and German, in addition to Russian - he also knew Georgian, like his father and Stalin.’
    • ‘Yes, I understand people in Georgia learn Russian in schools as well as Georgian, or at least they did so before the fall of the Soviet Union.’

Pronunciation

Georgian

/ˈdʒɔːdʒ(ə)n/

Main meanings of Georgian in English

: Georgian1Georgian2Georgian3

Georgian3

adjective

  • Relating to the state of Georgia in the US.

    ‘When a New Yorker next to him called attention to his Georgian accent, he replied, ‘We don't have an accent anymore.’’
    ‘That mattered in 1976, when Georgian Jimmy Carter beat Arizona Congressman Morris Udall and went on to win.’

noun

  • A native or inhabitant of Georgia.

    • ‘Although attacked by the farmers, officials with the U. S. Department of Agriculture shared many assumptions with the Georgians.’
    • ‘This is an attractive design around which all Georgians of mutual respect can rally.’
    • ‘If this group is really concerned about preserving Southern heritage, I hope they will join me in voting for a flag that all Georgians can take pride in.’
    • ‘The counties and cities of Georgia had chosen their own voting machines for the last time, and Georgians had lost their ability to recount their votes in contested elections.’
    • ‘If an Indian war were to break out, Georgians would be pleading for the presence, not the absence, of Redcoats.’
    • ‘Land hungry whites, Georgians in particular, continually encroached on Cherokee territory and contested Indian land ownership.’
    • ‘Red Eagle's father had been a white Georgian, his mother, a mixture of Creek and Scottish and French.’
    • ‘Mississippians voted to keep the Confederate stars and bars on the state flag by a 2-to-1 margin, and opinion polls suggest most Georgians are of a like mind.’

Pronunciation

Georgian

/ˈdʒɔːdʒ(ə)n/