Meaning of hallow in English:

hallow

Pronunciation /ˈhaləʊ/

See synonyms for hallow

Translate hallow into Spanish

verb

[with object]
  • 1Honour as holy.

    ‘the Ganges is hallowed as a sacred, cleansing river’
    • ‘So hallowed was the grain, that it was taboo to plant any other crop in the rice fields.’
    • ‘They penetrate every nook and cranny of a person's existence, hallowing even the lowliest acts and elevating them to a service to God.’
    • ‘He bemoaned that many Hindu temples in America are principally ostentatious vehicles for flaunting the wealth of their rich benefactors rather than hallowed ground for community worship.’
    • ‘After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name.’
    • ‘Cut out very clearly you can read it. ‘Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name’, goodness.’
    • ‘But when the Reality becomes incarnate as the express Image of God, images become hallowed.’
    • ‘Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name…’
    • ‘Though doubtless hallowed ground, the city fathers considered it now, 120 years on, far too valuable to languish as a repository for any fusty detritus the locals cared to throw in.’
    • ‘It seemed like a sacred place, like hallowed ground and he instinctively did what he could to honor it.’
    • ‘So holy is the spot to Judaism, that only when the Jewish Messiah arrives will Jews be permitted to once again step on the hallowed ground where their distant forbears worshipped.’
    • ‘In ancient times, at this very place, inside the walls of the hallowed city of Jerusalem, the ancestors of today's Jews also greeted a new Torah scroll with torches and dancing.’
    • ‘The first is the Bible's admonition to those who naïvely presume that it is their simple human right to live on this hallowed ground.’
    • ‘On a cold, damp winter day in central Maryland, U.S., a beautiful wooded hillside was transformed into a sacred grove, hallowed ground.’
    • ‘The rites would have been included in the Book of Occasional Services, which carries less heft with Episcopalians than the hallowed Book of Common Prayer.’
    • ‘On the whole, however, I would be more conservative with regard to the use of the Sanctus because of its hallowed place in the history of the Eucharistic prayer.’
    • ‘To invoke a hallowed Jewish category, Judaism is the religion that my Jewish ethnicity commands of me.’
    • ‘The Jew who prays today not only maintains the most hallowed of Jewish practices, he integrates the full range of the connections the Patriarchs established with God into his own spiritual essence.’
    • ‘Many of them bent to kiss the newly hallowed ground in thanks and blessing.’
    • ‘The Lord calls upon the faithful to set aside their material possessions and gather on hallowed ground to await their salvation.’
    • ‘Even without such extreme risk of discovery in a large city, Prophets could not walk on hallowed ground.’
    1. 1.1Make holy; consecrate.
      ‘the priest hallowed the wine’
      • ‘a theatre is a sort of church, hallowing the land on which it sits by its very presence’
      • ‘What Lincoln actually said at Gettysburg was: ‘We cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow this ground.’’
      • ‘In his CALL OF THE HORNED PIPER, Nigel Jackson gives a simple sort of ‘Eucharist’ consecration for hallowing bread and some milk or ale to the fey.’
      • ‘This is the sacrament of Holy Communion, instituted and hallowed by Christ himself - assuring us that we are accepted in the Beloved.’
      • ‘It is not the ground that hallowed the lives within its realm, but the lives that hallow the site.’
      • ‘But the most significant long-term result was to make marriage a respectable institution - a legal union regulated by the state and hallowed by the state church.’
      • ‘Throughout the ages, God has always hallowed certain places and been present to them in a special way.’
      • ‘Noah planted the grape vine and became drunk on its wine; Christ hallowed the fruit of the vine by pouring out his blood, uniting it with wine in the sacrament.’
      • ‘In all, this is a handsome book which gave me much pleasure as I toured vicariously places hallowed by centuries of Catholic piety.’
      • ‘The two vessels closest to the observer's eye further hallow this sanctum.’
      • ‘With this admixture he hallowed altar, walls, and floor, and spilled out that which remained at the base of the white altar stone.’

noun

archaic
  • A saint or holy person.

Origin

Old English hālgian (verb), hālga (noun), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German heiligen, also to holy.