Meaning of hostie in English:

hostie

Pronunciation /ˈhəʊsti/

nounhosties

informal Australian, New Zealand
  • A female flight attendant.

    • ‘an enraged hostie pushing a large trolley’
    • ‘The service: Pleasant and friendly but I almost had to hunt the hostie down to get a second glass of wine.’
    • ‘Even when I'm dozing, I'm usually aware of crew members occasionally strolling down the aisle, but ages go by without a single hostie appearing.’
    • ‘Flew to Atlanta from JNB recently on a stealth Delta 777, and spent nearly 15 hours in darkness, no IFE, no reading lights, no hostie call, no crew sympathy.’
    • ‘The wee hostie kicks things off by reminding us that "this is The Voice, Australia", which explains why I'm having trouble recognising anyone from Border Security in the line-up.’
    • ‘A hostie straddled the chair and lifted the unconscious elderly woman out of her window seat, so swiftly it was amazing.’
    • ‘Board as the last passenger, the hostie will have more time and space to ask the Captain when all the passengers have boarded, also make sure you prebook your seat in the front of the aircraft.’
    • ‘A Jetstar hostie gives me two Panadol and a sympathetic smile.’
    • ‘I've seen plenty of people escorted off a plane for simply arguing with the hostie.’
    • ‘He presses the button and tries the hostie again.’
    • ‘To top it all off we ended up with the rudest hostie in the world.’

Origin

1950s abbreviation of air hostess.