Meaning of impetration in English:

impetration

Pronunciation /ɪmpəˈtreɪʃ(ə)n/

noun

mass nounrare Theology
  • The action of requesting something fervently, or of obtaining something by fervent request.

    ‘While most theologians recognized the necessary distinction between the impetration and the application of reconciliation, yet often they failed to frame their postulates consistently therewith.’
    • ‘The Puritans drew a plain and broad line of demarcation between the impetration or purchase of salvation, and the actual application or bestowing of the same.’
    • ‘As we must distinguish between the impetration and the application of the atonement, so also must we between the grace of God decreeing and the execution of the decree of His grace.’
    • ‘By impetration we mean the purchase of all good things made by Christ for us with and of the Father.’
    • ‘No prayer has such a power of impetration as that which comes from a will conformed to the will of God.’
    appeal, entreaty, plea, petition, solicitation, supplication, prayer, invocation

Origin

Late 15th century from Anglo-Norman French impetracioun or Latin impetratio(n-), from impetrare (see impetrate).