Meaning of in a class of its (or one's) own in English:

in a class of its (or one's) own

phrase

  • Unequalled, especially in excellence or performance.

    ‘British advertising is in a class of its own for inventiveness’
    • ‘For talent, performance, courage, survival and luck, both are in a class of their own.’
    • ‘This guy is in a class of his own, clearly taking pleasure in the performance as his fingers dance - blending blues, folk, rock and hillbilly fervour with a voice that echoes with conviction.’
    • ‘You are in a class of your own - don't let anyone knock you down!’
    • ‘Her accents were pretty flawless, even in the most emotionally fraught scenes, but when you are in a class of your own, the critics are that much fiercer.’
    • ‘She said: ‘It was a rollercoaster of emotions, I have supported England all the way, but Brazil are in a class of their own.’’
    • ‘While the pre-election surveys have got a bad name in 2004, the exit polls are in a class of their own.’
    • ‘The resentful intellectuals of France, however, are in a class of their own.’
    • ‘His trademark melodies and lyrics are in a class of their own and his voice expresses emotion like few others can.’
    • ‘They are strong at the back, very formidable at midfield, while their forwards are in a class of their own.’
    • ‘It's this range of inventiveness that puts these improvisations in a class of their own.’