Meaning of insurrection in English:

insurrection

Pronunciation /ˌɪnsəˈrɛkʃ(ə)n/

See synonyms for insurrection

Translate insurrection into Spanish

noun

  • A violent uprising against an authority or government.

    ‘the insurrection was savagely put down’
    • ‘opposition to the regime led to armed insurrection’
    • ‘For a short while, the police continued to insist that they had thwarted an armed insurrection.’
    • ‘Most of the uprisings were local insurrections against specific circumstances - usually the building of a castle or the exactions of a local Norman lord.’
    • ‘One sector, led by the Ministry of Education and the Mayor of Caracas, called for a popular insurrection to defend the government.’
    • ‘The insurrection swept the old government from office and could only be crushed by the might of the Russian army.’
    • ‘The popular insurrection gave the government a much greater mandate than any election.’
    • ‘An urban insurrection in Jerusalem was followed by a general uprising of the Jewish peasantry.’
    • ‘Stalin saw the organisers of the insurrection as reactionary nationalists who would stand in the way of future Soviet hegemony.’
    • ‘They were under the general orders of Mola and Franco, the leaders of the military insurrection that had sparked the Spanish Civil War.’
    • ‘An agrarian insurrection swept across the region in the 1880s.’
    • ‘1968 was the big year of revolt, its epicentre the student-led insurrection in Paris.’
    • ‘The Maoist rebels have been waging a Marxist insurrection in Nepal for nine years to abolish the monarchy.’
    • ‘However, international governing bodies can help to shed light on the relation of proper authority to revolutionary wars and political insurrections through their legitimacy-conferring function.’
    • ‘Nothing frightened slave-dependent societies more than the prospect of widespread slave insurrections.’
    • ‘In Germany workers played a leading part in the 1848 insurrections.’
    • ‘There is a long history of sections of the army and even the police coming over to the side of the people during insurrections.’
    • ‘In 1920 British troops put down an insurrection in Iraq, and crushed protests and strikes in favour of independence in Egypt.’
    • ‘In February 1917 economic strikes and food protests led by women fused into a general strike that drew the army into an insurrection.’
    • ‘An insurrection by French resistance forces freed the city.’
    • ‘Then there was an insurrection in which the British killed 10,000 people.’
    rebellion, revolt, uprising, mutiny, revolution, insurgence, insurgency, rising, rioting, riot, sedition
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English via Old French from late Latin insurrectio(n-), from insurgere ‘rise up’.