Main meanings of leer in English

: leer1leer2

leer1

verb

[no object]
  • Look or gaze in a lascivious or unpleasant way.

    ‘bystanders were leering at the nude painting’
    • ‘He leered at me, and grinned through a veritable jungle of bad facial hair.’
    • ‘A group of men were standing on the balcony, leering at girls and making inappropriate comments.’
    • ‘He stared down at her and leered, his eyes filled with madness and lust.’
    • ‘He shot up and saw the trespasser leering at him through the pane.’
    • ‘Lil is standing at the counter waiting to order, and in the background Paul is leering at her from the table he is sharing with David.’
    • ‘Nikolas handed him money and stared as the old man leered at Dawn.’
    • ‘A drunk strange woman in the street leered at me, shouting, ‘What have you got there?’’
    • ‘I looked up and saw the face of my coach, leering at me.’
    • ‘He turned slowly, expecting to see a legion of angry mermen leering down at him from behind pointed spears.’
    • ‘The assassin possessively slid an arm around the woman when he noted a few men were eyeing the pair, many openly leering at Nicole.’
    • ‘I know she wasn't actually leering at me, in particular, but that's how it seemed.’
    • ‘She stood with her hands braced firmly on her hips, leering into the trees.’
    • ‘Wishing to keep her attention away from the man who was leering at her, Edmund struck up a conversation.’
    • ‘The male models eyed them appreciatively, but to Aimée it looked like they were leering at her.’
    • ‘Kayla lifted her head from its comfortable position on Landon's body to find Todd leering at her.’
    • ‘The walk was good and enjoyable even though she noticed the men leering at her as she turned down one of the back alleys.’
    • ‘He whirled around to find an impossibly tall, cloaked figure leering ominously at them.’
    • ‘He stood there a while, leering drunkenly, until the woman noticed him and let loose a scream.’
    • ‘The other girl just shrugged and came a little closer, leering oddly at Kathleen.’
    ogle, look lasciviously, look suggestively, give sly looks to, eye, watch, stare, goggle
    View synonyms

noun

  • A lascivious or unpleasant look.

    ‘he gave me a sly leer’
    • ‘The group relaxed, and Jake grinned his wolflike leer again as he lined up his next shot.’
    • ‘He lit a cigarette and took a swig of the alcohol and grinned at me, a grin that was rapidly becoming a leer.’
    • ‘He gives them with a sinister look or two with a leer on his face.’
    • ‘He caught up to her, his face eased into its usual expression, which was something between a smirk and a leer.’
    • ‘He's still staring at me avidly - it's almost a leer - and he's not an attractive sight.’
    • ‘She grinned - it was more of a snarling leer - and shook her head a bit, drawing a crossbow from the packs on her stallion's rump.’
    • ‘Kyle got up, and looked at Ginger with an unpleasant leer.’
    • ‘‘It was nice seeing you two,’ he said, glancing over at Keenan whose lips were curled in a sly leer.’
    • ‘It wasn't even a smile; it was more like a leer.’
    • ‘With assured grins and malicious leers they crept in toward us.’
    • ‘Depicting three figures or portraits on each treated in typical Dumas style, the effect was at once awesome and intimately unsettling as noses melt into eyes and smiles become leers.’
    • ‘But, said the leader of the environment committee with a smile that looked like a leer, nothing more could be done without a planning Inquiry and we would, of course, be allowed to make our objections then.’
    • ‘The contrast between the lascivious leers of the Duke who anticipates his prize, and the heartbroken, genuine love of Christian, underscores magnificently the tragedy of Satine's death.’
    • ‘All I could see was her smirk in my mind, the ever-present leer that had come to mean so much for me.’
    lecherous look, lascivious look, suggestive look, ogle, sly glance, stare
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the general sense ‘look sideways or askance’): perhaps from obsolete leer ‘cheek’, from Old English hlēor, as though the sense were ‘to glance over one's cheek’.

Pronunciation

leer

/lɪə/

Main meanings of leer in English

: leer1leer2

leer2

noun

variant spelling of lehr