Meaning of lesson in English:

lesson

Pronunciation /ˈlɛs(ə)n/

See synonyms for lesson

Translate lesson into Spanish

noun

  • 1A period of learning or teaching.

    ‘an advanced lesson in maths’
    • ‘a driving lesson’
    • ‘With the first two lessons, students are learning right away that a sketchbook is not necessarily a book of drawings, but a tool for the artist to use in many different ways.’
    • ‘Many teachers elect to continue teaching private or group lessons during the summer.’
    • ‘Word quickly spread about the convenience and economy that could result from teaching survival lessons at a distance.’
    • ‘She has a particular interest in developing integrated cross-curriculum lessons with classroom teachers.’
    • ‘The second block requires teacher candidates to teach independent lessons.’
    • ‘If a child is going to be successful academically, teachers must adapt lessons to meet that child's specific learning needs.’
    • ‘There are many examples of very good and occasionally excellent teaching observed in lessons across the school.’
    • ‘You've just came back from a tutoring lesson, right after school.’
    • ‘Music lessons for school children are taking place in the Community Centre each Saturday afternoon.’
    • ‘Before the summit, transport providers were given advanced driving lessons in order to save energy and to reduce air pollution.’
    • ‘I have wanted to work as a counselor from my home or teach private piano lessons.’
    • ‘Take a private tennis lesson from a pro or choose a women-only class.’
    • ‘He quickly began thinking of how to go about teaching his first dance lesson ever.’
    • ‘I took my first swimming lessons when I was 18 months old.’
    • ‘Anyway, there is this really attractive woman who takes singing lessons at our school.’
    • ‘She started teaching piano lessons at age 8 to her neighborhood friends shortly after she started taking lessons.’
    • ‘Despite the pain, she has started taking PE lessons again at school.’
    • ‘She taught herself the instrument for a year before she began taking guitar lessons.’
    • ‘She studied math at New York Community College and earned enough money working part-time to begin private flying lessons.’
    • ‘One method is to exchange lessons with a Chinese teacher.’
    class, session, seminar, tutorial, lecture, period
    exercise, assignment, school task, drill
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    1. 1.1A thing learned or to be learned by a pupil.
      ‘he had a facility for languages and had learned his lessons well’
      • ‘Today's object lesson is the coverage of a promising medical breakthrough.’
      • ‘Today had to start out with one of those little object lessons in manners.’
      • ‘Despite the fact that this lesson took several class periods to complete, I feel it was definitely worth it.’
    2. 1.2A thing learned by experience.
      ‘lessons should have been learned from two similar collisions’
      • ‘I had received a memorable lesson in the ability of inexplicable experience to produce powerful emotion.’
      • ‘Discover the hidden lesson in each experience to develop a profound understanding of life and yourself.’
      • ‘When you are constantly aware, every experience becomes a lesson in life.’
      • ‘Surely mistakes were made, and valuable lessons learned.’
      • ‘To this day, we are drawing important lessons from their experience.’
      • ‘I've learned hard lessons from my experience with credit cards.’
      • ‘I have been climbing for about three years and I have learned many lessons from my experiences.’
      • ‘So far the experience has proved positive, but she has learned lessons along the way.’
      • ‘The lessons appear clear: engage the moderates or the consequences could be dire.’
      • ‘He just took things as they came and learned the lessons along the way.’
      • ‘Along the way, life lessons are learned and current social issues are explored, but it rarely feels heavy-handed.’
      • ‘They worked very well together and learned many valuable lessons about how a real business works.’
      • ‘We've learned many lessons over the years running a year-round program.’
      • ‘Surely our friends have learned lessons from the past.’
      • ‘However, we have learned valuable lessons from this confrontation.’
      • ‘At least, she says, she has learned lessons from her disastrous first relationship.’
      • ‘Hopefully, we have now learned our lesson from the past.’
      • ‘Teaching this important lesson is not something you will be able to do on your own.’
      • ‘I believe that if a personal event offers a life lesson and can inform our art, then it needs to be passed on as a teaching.’
      • ‘Mr. Putin must learn the real lessons of this tragic event.’
      knowledge, wisdom, enlightenment, experience, truths
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    3. 1.3An experience or event that serves as a warning or encouragement.
      ‘let that be a lesson to you!’
      • ‘The epitaph of ancient democracy was a bitter legacy that should have served as a salutary lesson to all.’
      • ‘Such leaders seem impervious to the salutary lessons from the experience in East Asia where a commitment to growth-oriented policies led to sharp declines in poverty.’
      • ‘We must never forget the intensely human story of the lessons, warnings and inspirations that story holds for us today.’
      • ‘This sentence should serve as a lesson to others who also believe they can outrun the law.’
      • ‘This shameful case should serve as a painful lesson for those in power.’
      • ‘The feelings, however, are valid and these words will serve as reminders and lessons.’
      • ‘The silver lining, however, is that at least it served to provide the lessons on which the far more successful policies of the second half of the century were founded.’
      • ‘What happened in those economies is history, albeit a painful one, and should serve as a lesson to all other third world countries working on large amounts of debt.’
      • ‘Have we learned nothing from this, and other similar lessons of the past?’
      • ‘The entire episode is a dramatic lesson in the breathtaking callousness of government officials at the ground level.’
      • ‘Somewhere, there's a lesson in that for Europe's leaders.’
      • ‘There was a lesson in that, and I won't forget it.’
      warning, deterrent, caution
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  • 2A passage from the Bible read aloud during a church service, especially either of two readings at morning and evening prayer in the Anglican Church.

    ‘he went up to read the first lesson’
    • ‘A few days after reading this report I opened my Bible to read the lesson for the daily office.’
    • ‘Although not a regular worshipper at St Mary's, he often read Christmas lessons at the church, and was heavily involved in the Thundridge community.’
    • ‘It is not achieved either, when one or two persons out of a crowd of hundreds read a lesson or take part in a prayer.’
    • ‘Inside the church, Lord Archer read the lesson during what was described as a simple and dignified service.’
    • ‘Dr Hope will read the first lesson from Ecclesiastes 12: 1-7 and the Abbey Choir will sing Psalm 121.’
    • ‘Scripture lessons, read by the master of the house, occurred twice a day, in the morning and evening.’
    • ‘I cannot read this morning's gospel lesson without a little nostalgia.’
    • ‘The church was well attended for the carol service last Sunday, where the lessons were read beautifully by young people from Silchester.’
    • ‘The two girls tease Johnny about the morning's bible lesson.’
    • ‘The Bible lesson each week reflects the theme in some way.’
    Bible reading, Bible passage, scripture, text, reading
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verb

[with object]
  • 1 archaic Instruct or teach (someone)

    • ‘Metaneone had beforehand lessoned him what he should say’
    1. 1.1Rebuke (someone)
      • ‘Oedipus has been lessoned to humility before the throne of Zeus’

Phrases

    teach someone a lesson
    • Punish or hurt someone as a deterrent or warning.

      ‘they were teaching me a lesson for daring to complain’
      • ‘The Catalan region taught me a lesson in sobriety and discipline but also to love its freedom.’
      • ‘Therefore, it is not our intention to punish you, but rather to teach you a lesson.’
      • ‘Perhaps this will teach you a lesson, and be a warning for any of those thinking of rebelling.’
      • ‘Perhaps, it's his way of teaching them a lesson for becoming unruly at times.’
      • ‘Even in accepting my gift, he was teaching me a lesson.’
      • ‘Treat these folks right or they may not vote at all, just to teach you a lesson.’
      • ‘Our nation's experience with prescription drugs should teach us a lesson.’
      • ‘‘I would like to teach them a lesson,’ said Mrs North.’
      • ‘He decided to teach them a lesson and it was a wrong move.’
      • ‘If we can make these criminals run back and forth from the court on a number of grievous charges then that would teach them a lesson.’

Origin

Middle English from Old French leçon, from Latin lectio (see lection).