Meaning of litre in English:

litre

(US liter) (also l)

Pronunciation /ˈliːtə/

Translate litre into Spanish

noun

  • A metric unit of capacity, formerly defined as the volume of one kilogram of water under standard conditions, now equal to 1,000 cubic centimetres (about 1.75 pints)

    as modifier ‘a litre bottle of wine’
    • ‘In an irrigated area, a litre of milk takes at least 500 litres of water to produce.’
    • ‘Campaigners say just one litre can make a million litres of fresh water unfit to drink.’
    • ‘Before tax a litre of petrol is actually cheaper than a litre of bottled water.’
    • ‘Who would care when a litre of petrol was cheaper than a litre of bottled water?’
    • ‘The standard household lavatory, we are told, uses 7.5 litres of water per flush.’
    • ‘Paul drank almost six litres of water without counting swigs taken from bottles offered along the roadside.’
    • ‘When the roof is open, boot room is 208 litres, 63 litres more than the earlier model.’
    • ‘Burning fuel and debris were shoved out of the core before it was deluged with five million litres of water.’
    • ‘He also inventoried his provisions: two burritos, one liter of water, and some candy bar crumbs.’
    • ‘About four kilograms of pounded sorghum and eight kilograms of brown sugar are added to one hundred liters of water.’
    • ‘He drank three liters of water a day so he would not dehydrate.’
    • ‘Elephants consume around 250 liters of clean water daily.’
    • ‘The result is extrapolated to 60 seconds and reported in liters per minute.’
    • ‘A hydrant's minimum capacity must be 1,000 liters per minute.’
    • ‘He cut his tea back to one liter a day and did much better.’
    • ‘You should then drink 1.5 liters per 1kg of weight lost.’
    • ‘Two 8,000 - liter water tanks are installed for use by local residents.’
    • ‘At least 0.4 liters of diesel was needed to produce one kilogram of tea.’
    • ‘Recommendations run at about 1 liter per hour divided into 3-4 intakes.’
    • ‘The new pump should produce an additional 220,000 liters per hour.’

Origin

Late 18th century from French, alteration of litron (an obsolete measure of capacity), via medieval Latin from Greek litra, a Sicilian monetary unit.