Main meanings of loon in English

: loon1loon2loon3

loon1

Pronunciation /luːn/

Translate loon into Spanish

noun

informal
  • A silly or foolish person.

    • ‘if only she weren't such a lovesick loon’
    • ‘Prizes should be delivered to the TV director who cut to their box in time to catch him grinning like a loon, boffing a balloon about with his feet and hands.’
    • ‘Here, a sheepish young yakuza is ordered to kill his insane boss but things go awry when his elder disappears in a town full of loons, zombies, and halfwits.’
    • ‘And for another, hanging them on your lapel makes you look like a dork, or worse yet a loon.’
    • ‘They have the tendency to wear loud shirts and smile at you like loons.’
    • ‘Our local happy loons have nominated a sacrifice candidate to stand for Parliament - though they're a little unclear as to which electorate.’
    • ‘And yes, we jumped up and down and hugged like absolute loons.’
    • ‘It is de rigueur to ridicule them - of course they are laughable loons!’
    • ‘This is probably because we're not paranoid loons desperate for any pretext to start a fight.’
    • ‘We used to date sisters and we're both crazy as loons, so we have that much in common.’
    • ‘I love this comic, despite the fact Sim has degenerated into a frothing loon.’
    • ‘And I'd cheer too, waving like a loon from the sidelines.’
    • ‘The feeling of take-off makes me grin like a loon.’
    • ‘I'm aware that's an unpopular thing to say, and that many consider him a loon.’
    • ‘Instead of discussing the points he raises - points where most reasonable people would say reasonable people can disagree - you've all turned loons.’
    • ‘‘Yes, ma'am,’ said our director, grinning like a loon.’
    • ‘‘Alright then,’ said I and followed him into my parent's sitting room where he plinked and plonked what can only be described as ‘radical jazz’ on the piano and I danced around like a loon.’
    • ‘The 21-year-old waitress said: ‘I'm a bit of a loon but I think my personality will be perfect for a girl group as I'm great at getting everyone to laugh.’’
    • ‘Advice: do not wear and use hands-free kits for phones after dark unless you want people to think that you are a total loon.’
    • ‘What's important to you may not be important to anyone else, and what's important to me may make you think I'm a loon.’
    • ‘Not to be outdone, Adams takes over drumming duties, grinning like a loon.’
    idiot, halfwit, nincompoop, blockhead, buffoon, dunce, dolt, ignoramus, cretin, imbecile, dullard, moron, simpleton, clod

Origin

Late 19th century from loon (referring to the bird's actions when escaping from danger), perhaps influenced by loony.

Main meanings of loon in English

: loon1loon2loon3

loon2

Pronunciation /luːn/

Translate loon into Spanish

noun

North American
  • A large diving waterbird with a sleek black or grey head, a straight pointed bill, and short legs set far back under the body; a diver.

    ‘The first, innocuous shower stroked the lake's surface but, when the wind came up, the loons began to call madly.’
    • ‘Only those who have heard the sound of a loon or a wolf call can truly sympathise with the poet about the beauty of the sound: ‘The wolves howl with a loneliness that is only theirs.’’
    • ‘This year, the artists showcased their talent with birds for a theme competition, each displaying the delicate feathers of every bird, from eagles to loons.’
    • ‘Red-throated Loons breed farther north than any other loon.’
    • ‘Few if any fish survive in acid lakes, so loons have less food for their young.’

Origin

Mid 17th century probably by alteration of Shetland dialect loom, denoting especially a guillemot or a diver, from Old Norse.

Main meanings of loon in English

: loon1loon2loon3

loon3

Pronunciation /luːn/

Translate loon into Spanish

verb

informal British no object, with adverbial
  • Act in a foolish or desultory way.

    • ‘he decided to loon around London’
    • ‘Then again, the man who turned looning into a full-time career generally looks quite vacant.’
    • ‘I had looned and lazied my way through physical childhood and the misfortune of a crazed adolescence.’
    • ‘We'd set the bands gear up and generally idle the afternoon away in the bar playing pool, looning around on the beach, and hanging out in various cafés dotted around town before the serious business of playing heavy metal started in the evening.’
    • ‘The group consisted of everyone from complete novices through to experienced riders, this made for a great sociable chilled out day of looning around in the woods.’

Origin

1960s of unknown origin.