Meaning of nominally in English:

nominally

Pronunciation /ˈnɒmɪn(ə)li/

Translate nominally into Spanish

adverb

  • In name only; officially though perhaps not in reality.

    ‘the Republicans nominally controlled both houses of Congress but by slim margins’
    • ‘nominally independent newspapers’
    • ‘The legislature and judiciary are nominally independent but remain susceptible to executive influence.’
    • ‘Nominally, at least, the debate in the Senate is about who should impose the standards.’
    • ‘Songwriters and composers are only nominally compensated when a CD is purchased.’
    • ‘My mother, while nominally Catholic, never insisted that I become Catholic as well.’
    • ‘The governments in the 1980s were nominally civilian, but were dominated by the military.’
    • ‘Both parties have at least nominally committed to long-term emissions reductions.’
    • ‘This policy was the means by which the bureaucracy sought to defend its own narrow and selfish interests, in opposition to the needs of the workers it nominally represented.’
    • ‘These may be nominally democratic countries, but state officials there are still regarded with fear, rather than as public servants.’
    • ‘Seventy percent of the population nominally belongs to the Anglican/Episcopal church.’
    • ‘The visual quality is nominally better than that of the original broadcast - nominally.’
    • ‘It's nominally a documentary, but not necessarily a wholly truthful one.’
    • ‘As my whole generation discovered, the world, whether at war or - nominally - at peace, has in any case kept moving in on us.’