Meaning of oar in English:

oar

Pronunciation /ɔː/

Translate oar into Spanish

noun

  • 1A pole with a flat blade, used to row or steer a boat through the water.

    ‘she pulled hard on the oars’
    • ‘As well as traditional rowing oars and sculls, they manufacture oars for surf boat rowing, and transatlantic teams.’
    • ‘I love being on the water, I love the sound the water makes and the oars on the boat, all of those things.’
    • ‘Organised by the Gauteng Dragon Boat Association, long boats and oars will be provided for participants who do not have their own team boat.’
    • ‘She saw a small wooden dock, and a wooden rowboat with two oars floating in the water.’
    • ‘Kaishek failed to notice the concealed motion and came at his opponent with both blades swirling like the oars of a seven man regatta rowing boat.’
    • ‘In his opinion, it is very important to have on board: oars, oarlocks, a boat hook, a good knife, a sounder and the mobile phone.’
    • ‘We docked by a port with several other boats in, most of them small rowing boats with oars.’
    • ‘They pull hard at the oars until the boat is abreast of the island, and then they ram the bow against its icy littoral.’
    • ‘The eight occupants of the boat take to the oars, pulling hard against the wind and waves.’
    • ‘The starboard oars dipped into the water and were held fast and the great ship slowed and stopped.’
    • ‘Slowly, she got into the rowing boat, shipped the oars and made her way across to the centre of the river.’
    • ‘Sailors pushed up and down on the oars like a water pump to manoeuvre the boat.’
    • ‘Sitting high in the water their oars were clearing the waves and the crew looked polished and clean.’
    • ‘Smith got his oar stuck in the water and had to stop rowing with 600 metres to go.’
    • ‘After dark, we could hear the sound of oars of an approaching dinghy.’
    • ‘Each boat contains a crew of two and each crew rows an identical 7.1 metre boat that includes two sliding seats and the same sculling oars as used in standard rowing boats.’
    • ‘He relates the importance of the thole, which secures the oar to the boat, and notes that towing was the expedition's worst job assignment.’
    • ‘The canoe slowed down to a stop and Pierce set the oars back in the boat.’
    • ‘The ship can be easily steered with just the oars doing all the work when the sail is down.’
    • ‘The fine owner of a lodge at the shoreline was gracious enough to offer an aluminum boat with oars for our use.’
    oar, scull, sweep, blade, spoon, spade
    1. 1.1An oarsman; a rower.
      ‘I was stroke oar and John was in the bow’
      • ‘The crew suddenly lost their stroke oar to eligibility issues, and Erickson was back to the drawing board to find a line-up.’
      • ‘He is considered by many as the best ‘stroke’ oar in the long history of lightweight rowing at Harvard.’
      • ‘The person on the port side all the way aft is the stroke oar, the rower who sets the pace that everyone else must match.’

verb

[with object]
  • Propel with or as if with oars; row.

    ‘oaring the sea like madmen’
    • ‘oaring through the weeds’
    • ‘They're oared to the docks where a Guild Estimator boards and examines the cargo, noting its quality and determining the number of lots that will go up for sale.’
    • ‘In May, foods and prayers are offered to Tin Hau, the goddess of fishermen, and the following month the brightly decorated Dragon Boats are oared swiftly in races through Hong Kong's waters.’
    • ‘But everything progressed smoothly and he oared his canopy slow and smooth on the calm river, along with many others, all dreaming to reach the pinnacle of success through self-actualization.’
    • ‘The inhabitants of the area have long sailed, poled and oared their way along the delta's vast network of channels, which, in the pre-French era linked them to Southeast Asia's expanding markets.’

Phrases

    rest on one's oars
    • Relax one's efforts.

      ‘There is no need and no scope for resting on our oars.’
      • ‘So to the boffins who might think otherwise, rest on your oars and watch it happen.’
      • ‘The negotiating team decided to rest on their oars and wait until their partners had a chance to consider the offer.’
      • ‘Have the Russians already digested the lesson that a balance of deterrents produces an equilibrium on the strength of which one can rest one's oars?’
    stick one's oar in
    mainly British informal
    • Give an opinion without being asked.

      • ‘he's never afraid to stick his oar in when he feels the referee has wronged his team’
      • ‘she was talking to me just now, before you put your oar in’
      • ‘Until the PC do-gooders stuck their oar in, schools could punish those who needed it.’
      • ‘Excuse me for sticking my oar in, but for me there can be only one winner of the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award, which will be announced today.’
      • ‘Worse still, she's been sticking her oar in with a new staff member - giving her her own special take on the personnel and the running of the department.’
      • ‘The minister argued that education should be at the centre of political discussion: ‘Everyone is allowed to put his oar in on how to overcome our economic problems.’
      • ‘It's rare to see a film these days where the studio hasn't come in and stuck their oar in because they are scared the audience will be shocked or leave unhappy because the good guy died.’
      • ‘Every one else is jumping on the health bandwagon, so I might as well stick my oar in.’
      • ‘At this point, the guard, who had been skulking around listening to our conversation, decided to stick his oar in.’
      • ‘Will State and Territory governments now put their oar in?’
      • ‘Since everyone's speculating, I might as well stick my oar in.’
      • ‘But the government sticking their oar in is an entirely different matter.’

Origin

Old English ār, of Germanic origin; related to Danish and Norwegian åre.