Main meanings of pend in English

: pend1pend2pend3pend4pend5

pend1

Pronunciation /pɛnd/

noun

dialect British, East Anglian English
  • Pressure, strain; an awkward or difficult situation.

Origin

Middle English (in an earlier sense). Apparently the regional (south-eastern and East Anglian) reflex of an Old English (i-mutated) by-form of pound. Compare Middle Low German pend pond (one isolated attestation in a 15th-cent. translation of an Old Frisian document).

Main meanings of pend in English

: pend1pend2pend3pend4pend5

pend2

Pronunciation /pɛnd/

noun

(also pen)
Scottish
  • An arch, an archway; an arched or vaulted roof or canopy; the vaulted ground floor of a tower or fortified building; a covered passage or entry; (in later use) especially one leading off a street frontage.

Origin

Late Middle English. Probably from pend.

Main meanings of pend in English

: pend1pend2pend3pend4pend5

pend3

Pronunciation /pɛnd/

verb

dialect British, East Anglian English
  • To pinch, be constricting. Also: to press or beat down. Compare pend .

Origin

Late Middle English (in an earlier sense). Originally a regional (south-eastern and East Anglian) variant of pind.

Main meanings of pend in English

: pend1pend2pend3pend4pend5

pend4

Pronunciation /pɛnd/

verb

  • 1 informal To depend on or upon.

  • 2To await conclusion or resolution.

Origin

Late 15th century (in an earlier sense). From Middle French pendre to hang, be suspended and its etymon post-classical Latin pendere for classical Latin pendēre to hang, of uncertain origin.

Main meanings of pend in English

: pend1pend2pend3pend4pend5

pend5

Pronunciation /pɛnd/

verb

Business
  • To treat as pending; to postpone deciding on or attending to; to defer.

Origin

1950s; earliest use found in Pamela Frankau (1908–1967), novelist. Back-formation from pending.