Meaning of pleach in English:

pleach

Pronunciation /pliːtʃ/

verb

[with object]
  • Entwine or interlace (tree branches) to form a hedge or provide cover for an outdoor walkway.

    ‘if you wish to pleach your trees, winter is the time’
    • ‘There are pleached trees laden with apples and a huge fig tree drips with almost-ripe fruit.’
    • ‘If space is really a problem, consider pleaching a pear tree against a south facing wall.’
    • ‘In Ireland, don't even think about growing it unless you live in one of those hot pockets warmed by the Gulf Stream, where it should do well pleached on a warm sunny wall.’
    • ‘You also might want to experiment with some specialized design techniques, such as using pruning to create a pleached tunnel of ironwood trees or a living fence of espalier currants.’
    • ‘An avenue of pleached limes has the lowest branches springing out from the main stem a good 2m from the ground, allowing a clear view through the young trunks.’
    • ‘The sides of the bowl are defined with pleached linden trees and parterres of golden privet, santolina, althernanthera, Korean boxwood and red-leaf Japanese barberry with begonias, lantanas, fucshia and cone-shaped yew topiary.’
    • ‘The process included grafting and pleaching, as well as other specialist techniques he called ‘trade secrets.’’
    wind round, twist round, coil round, wrap round, weave, intertwine, interlink, interlace, interweave, interthread, criss-cross, entangle, tangle

Origin

Late Middle English from an Old French variant of plaissier (see plash).