Main meanings of pout in English

: pout1pout2

pout1

Pronunciation /paʊt/

See synonyms for pout

Translate pout into Spanish

verb

[no object]
  • Push one's lips or one's bottom lip forward as an expression of petulant annoyance or in order to make oneself look sexually attractive.

    ‘she lounged on the steps, pouting’
    • ‘he shrugged and pouted his lips’
    • ‘Joe, not quite understanding the message, pouts.’
    • ‘It's a sad day when a politician loses his mind and pouts and cries like a spoiled little eight year old brat because he didn't get it the way he wanted.’
    • ‘I introduce myself to the lady now seated on the other side of my computer, who plonks herself down on the table next to me and pouts.’
    • ‘So he sits in Parliament and pouts, says nothing of substance, and does nothing for those who voted for him.’
    • ‘It's like the inner child in me goes and pouts in the corner and won't listen to reason.’
    • ‘Noel pouts and the serious atmosphere is broken by her childish expression.’
    • ‘The teenage girl pouted her lips like a little child.’
    • ‘He pouted slightly, making him even look more childish and even more adorable.’
    • ‘"Not until you come and say you're sorry " he pouted playfully.’
    • ‘He pouted playfully and walked out the back door towards the back lawn of the manor.’
    • ‘The younger girl pouted into the mirror, testing the effect of the makeup.’
    • ‘She crossed her arms and stuck her tongue out at him, pouting again.’
    • ‘As the topic changed to our Latin papers, I started pouting again.’
    • ‘He stepped out of the shadows and pushed back the hood, pouting a bit.’
    • ‘"I miss you, " he mouthed and he jokingly pouted at me.’
    • ‘She stuck her tongue at me and pouted sulkily.’
    • ‘I crossed my arms across my chest and pouted like a little kid.’
    • ‘I wanted to sulk and pout like a little kid.’
    • ‘When he was in the fountain he started crying and pouting like a little baby.’
    look petulant, pull a face, look sulky, purse one's lips, make a moue, turn the corners of one's mouth down
    View synonyms

noun

  • A pouting expression.

    ‘his lower lip protruded in a sulky pout’
    • ‘He whines pitifully, a pout forming his expression.’
    • ‘Once she let him go, her expression faded into a pout.’
    • ‘It was accompanied by a photograph of him walking across the pitch with a serious expression and a pout that made him look like Donald Duck.’
    • ‘They sport sulky plump pouts, heavy make-up, plucked eyebrows and slinky hips.’
    • ‘The postbags under his eyes have lost a few bulging packages, and his naturally sulky pout seems, if not upturned into an actual smile, at least faintly curved.’
    • ‘Michael could feel the mental pout from his counterpart.’
    • ‘Her pout turned into a grimace, when the peroxide started to bubble.’
    • ‘‘Oh, come now,’ she replied, putting on an expression that was something like a mock pout.’
    • ‘She was trying for a sultry pout, and achieving an expression of sullen vexation instead.’
    • ‘‘Yes, I do,’ she retorted, unaware of how cute (at least to Adam) she looked with that sulky pout.’
    • ‘The sentence lasted a period of a few hours when pouts gave way to giggles; of course the stuffed animal may have played a part as well in her softening demeanor.’
    • ‘Also, the coolness factor is high, so few patrons are willing to break their surface pouts.’
    • ‘He, and some other classmates, were imitating the way our form teacher pouts.’
    • ‘I read it again, but instead of seeing a heavily made up moll with a dark bob and beaded dress with a pout, I envisioned a sleazy, straight, middle-aged white man.’
    • ‘It's pretty hard to keep up a good pout when you're mooning over a feline.’
    • ‘They should state clearly and concisely, without a sneery pout, that it's just another contractual obligation, among many, that must be fulfilled.’
    • ‘Then he purses his lips in a little pout but says nothing, gets a veiled look in his eye, and who knows what he's thinking anymore.’
    • ‘But lady, a messy ponytail and a squinty pout do not equal good acting.’
    • ‘I was still a bad kid with an attitude and a pout that Mom always threatened to make into a bookshelf.’
    • ‘She was wearing an indignant expression, hands on her hips, and a slight pout on her full lips.’
    petulant expression, sulky expression, moue, face, scowl, glower
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): perhaps from the base of Swedish dialect puta ‘be inflated’. Compare with pout.

Main meanings of pout in English

: pout1pout2

pout2

Pronunciation /paʊt/

See synonyms for pout

Translate pout into Spanish

noun

another term for bib (sense 2 of the noun)
another term for eelpout
‘It also attracts additional dogfish, flounders, rockling, pout and school bass and makes for a busy session.’
  • ‘A small inshore member of the cod family, the pouting is one of the most common fish around the British coast and can make up a large percentage of angler catches.’
  • ‘There is nothing worse than a pouting that's been asleep all day in a plastic bag, or a mackerel that's been slipped down someone's gumboot.’
  • ‘The problem with using baited feathers is that invariably the fish will spin as you reel them in, especially if you pick up an occasional pouting as well.’
  • ‘In fishing terms this means that if you catch a small pouting or bootlace eel, follow the following guide and the hooklength can be saved!’

Origin

Old English pūta (only in ǣlepūta ‘eelpout’); related to Dutch puit ‘frog, chub’, puitaal ‘eelpout’, and perhaps to pout.