Meaning of put (or have) the wind up in English:

put (or have) the wind up

phrase

informal British
  • Alarm or frighten (or be alarmed or frightened)

    ‘Frank was trying to put the wind up him so that he would be too agitated to think clearly’
    • ‘Spending ten minutes putting the wind up pregnant women about epidurals doesn't help things, especially when she admitted that 50% of women at the hospital end up having one.’
    • ‘The section of the speech on crime should have put the wind up anyone with even the smallest affection for civil liberties, the rule of law and the independence of the judiciary.’
    • ‘But his chances of election have put the wind up the US Congress.’
    • ‘The company, which was a novice to the home loan business only a year ago, has put the wind up traditional lenders with the success of its simple and flexible loan.’
    • ‘Focused on fast ships capable of 31 knots, this has put the wind up rivals, few of which have the resources to match this kind of investment.’
    • ‘Young, thrusting and ambitious, the partnership had put the wind up some of the crustier firms of Scottish beancounters.’
    • ‘I reckon he's trying to put the wind up the competition from the off.’
    • ‘Others, presumably to put the wind up a middle-class academic, exaggerated their crimes.’
    • ‘A kestrel wheeled over the larches and put the wind up the wood pigeons.’
    • ‘I won't give the game away here, but it's nothing to put the wind up your maiden aunt.’
    scare, frighten, make afraid, make nervous, throw into a panic, panic, alarm, unnerve