Meaning of reconstruction in English:

reconstruction

Pronunciation /riːkənˈstrʌkʃn/

Translate reconstruction into Spanish

noun

  • 1mass noun The action or process of reconstructing or being reconstructed.

    ‘the economic reconstruction of Russia’
    • ‘There should also be an appraisal of Britain's role in the post-war, reconstruction process.’
    • ‘The grant is not only timely but it comes at a critical time when the country is grappling with the economic reconstruction programme.’
    • ‘Emerging from the war physically devastated, Europe began a process of both economic and political reconstruction.’
    • ‘Yet the slow process of reconstruction, following the ravages of a diamond-fuelled civil war, continues.’
    • ‘As the city entered the 1980s, it began to embark on a large-scale process of urban reconstruction.’
    • ‘This is a serious problem which impedes the process of reconstruction.’
    • ‘To this must be added the cost of the ongoing, even if limited, process of reconstruction.’
    • ‘It really brought home to me how the relief effort and the process of reconstruction must go hand in hand.’
    • ‘That is the greatest impediment to the political and economic reconstruction of the country.’
    • ‘Plans for how the civil administration of the country would work were vague, as were those for its economic reconstruction.’
    • ‘It was astonishing to hear how the process of reconstruction had already begun by the morning after the attacks.’
    • ‘The same drive is apparent in the process of reconstruction.’
    • ‘The process of reconstruction was so immense that all countries struggled to cope.’
    • ‘Once the monetary settlement is received, property owners can begin the process of reconstruction.’
    • ‘Women were indispensable in this many-sided economic and social reconstruction.’
    • ‘The reconstruction process has strongly affected the position and morale of local residents.’
    • ‘After the war, capital and labor must be expended in reconstruction and repair.’
    • ‘The worst hit areas are now engaged in the biggest post-catastrophe reconstruction programme since the Second World War.’
    • ‘The reconstruction of Rousse railway station is to cost nine million leva.’
    • ‘The Bali government has set aside special funds for the reconstruction of the area damaged in the bombing.’
    modification, modifying, alteration, adaptation, regulation, regulating, rearrangement, change, converting, conversion
    1. 1.1count noun A thing that has been rebuilt after being damaged or destroyed.
      ‘comparison between the original and the reconstruction’
      • ‘In the museum gardens are several reconstructions including a Roman temple, shop, house, and Northumbrian croft, all with audio presentations.’
      • ‘The present Guildhall is a reconstruction necessitated by damage to the original during the Second World War.’
      • ‘The next gallery consisted of a reconstruction of the painting studio on the ground floor of the Yellow House.’
      • ‘The venues will be reconstructions of the historic originals, which will also be used for film presentations at the same time.’
      • ‘It has a reconstruction of a prison cell, a 1930s pub and a 1940s kitchen, plus a lot of videos, sounds and smells.’
      • ‘This recording is a laboratory reconstruction of the sounds heard by Huygens' microphones.’
      • ‘The Globe Theatre is a reconstruction of the theatre in which Shakespeare's plays were originally staged.’
      • ‘It is a reconstruction of the original building, as far as it was known from sketches of the period.’
      • ‘Healy visited libraries and scholarly collections looking for reconstructions of the ruins.’
      • ‘Only a few fragments of the original statue survive, and the present hall and central Buddha are reconstructions from the Edo period.’
      • ‘This is a piffling amount, considering the millions of pounds of public lottery cash which has been spent on fabulous reconstructions of Glasgow's cultural palaces.’
      • ‘The reconstruction of one of the buildings gives an impression of how they may have looked.’
      improvement, betterment, amelioration, refinement, rectification, correction, rehabilitation
    2. 1.2count noun An impression, model, or re-enactment of a past event formed from the available evidence.
      ‘a reconstruction of the accident would be staged to try to discover the cause of the tragedy’
      • ‘What follows is a brief account of my experiences and a reconstruction of some events from discussions with the victims.’
      • ‘Stylistically, it really set the tone for all the grainy filmed reconstructions of events we see in documentaries all the time nowadays.’
      • ‘The narrator explains that her story is an inexact reconstruction of events.’
      • ‘The reconstruction of that past has fallen to historians and archaeologists.’
      • ‘A reconstruction of the events leading up to his fatal skydive will also feature on this month's programme.’
      • ‘At a reconstruction of the events, the policeman who fired was unable to explain why the shots had gone off.’
      • ‘Police last night staged a reconstruction of the events leading to the bomb blast exactly one week after it happened.’
      • ‘Days after the murder, police staged a reconstruction of events and appealed for sightings of the white Nissan Sunny getaway car.’
      • ‘History is the reconstruction of the past in response to a new present that opens toward a new future.’
      • ‘Despite the popularity of true-life reconstructions, the dramatisation of actual events and real people is often controversial.’
      • ‘This is inevitable, and a reader may be ill at ease at the scarcity of evidence that underlies many of these reconstructions.’
      • ‘He claimed that he'd invented a method of recovering sound waves from the past and converting them into visual and acoustic reconstructions of history.’
      • ‘This is a small show that is chilling in its reconstruction of events, and shows just how close the Nazis came to having an atomic weapon.’
      • ‘Historians are happy to have four sources available for reconstruction of the actions, words, and intentions of Jesus.’
      • ‘He was in charge of this case and provided evidence as an expert in accident reconstruction, on consent of the defence.’
      • ‘Forensic teams had searched the field for clues, and detectives staged a reconstruction there of Sarah's last known movements.’
      • ‘The English Civil War Society will be staging a reconstruction of a skirmish that took place in Marlborough during the Civil War.’
      • ‘BBC Crimewatch will screen a reconstruction of the brutal attack tomorrow night.’
      • ‘Both shows will use computer-generated imagery and dramatic reconstructions to transport viewers back to ancient times.’
      • ‘In particular, Stearn rails against dramatic reconstructions using actors, which Schama says are essential to bring history alive on the screen.’
      • ‘Police scrambled the force helicopter and even took the unusual step of staging a reconstruction of his last known movements.’
  • 2ReconstructionThe period 1865–77 following the American Civil War, during which the southern states of the Confederacy were controlled by federal government and social legislation, including the granting of new rights to black people, was introduced.