Meaning of road to Damascus in English:

road to Damascus

noun

  • Used in reference to an important moment of insight, typically one that leads to a dramatic transformation of attitude or belief.

    ‘this might be a wake-up call for the Prime Minister—his road to Damascus’
    as modifier ‘her road to Damascus moment came when she was recovering from an operation in the mid-1980s’
    • ‘Far from a road to Damascus moment, the agreement was rather a modus vivendi by cunning, ruthless political operators.’
    • ‘It's in every backbencher's hands to make today the day Britain has a long overdue conversion on the road to Damascus.’
    • ‘At the same time I was going down my own personal road to Damascus.’
    • ‘It really does appear of late that the National Party itself has had a bit of a road to Damascus experience.’
    • ‘My first visit to a car-boot sale was hardly the road to Damascus—more of a dirt-track.’
    • ‘No-one would suggest, of course, that this sudden conversion on the road to Damascus has anything to do with the impending elections.’
    • ‘It is a revelation, not quite on the road to Damascus scale, but a pleasing experience nevertheless.’
    • ‘For each of these writers, the road to Damascus wound on through New York, and beyond.’
    • ‘His "road to Damascus" moment was not conventional.’
    • ‘The arrival of a credible challenger to political power in the theatre of domestic politics precipitated a "road to Damascus" moment for the incumbents.’
    • ‘Critics last night welcomed the move but baulked at the idea that the lender has had a 'Road to Damascus moment' over its ethics.’
    • ‘The Prime Minister explained his road to Damascus experience during his speech on January 28.’

Origin

Mid 19th century with reference to the account of St Paul's conversion to Christianity while travelling to the city of Damascus on a mission (Acts 9).