Meaning of ruffle in English:

ruffle

Pronunciation /ˈrʌf(ə)l/

Translate ruffle into Spanish

verb

[with object]
  • 1Disorder or disarrange (someone's hair), typically by running one's hands through it.

    ‘he ruffled her hair affectionately’
    • ‘He grinned contentedly as he ruffled my already tangled hair.’
    • ‘In the end, Lady Eleanor settled for a tender, parting kiss on each boy's forehead, affectionately ruffling his hair as she did so.’
    • ‘There was a static snap as the television turned on and Reid walked back, ruffling my hair affectionately as he swept past me and into the next room.’
    • ‘Mrs Clarke smiled at her daughter, ruffling her hair affectionately.’
    • ‘He planted himself in the armchair next to me, ruffling my hair affectionately as he sat down.’
    • ‘Trent chuckled and ruffled my hair affectionately.’
    • ‘Brian laughed and ruffled her hair affectionately.’
    • ‘She ruffled his thick hair affectionately and laughed.’
    • ‘He grabbed my head and ruffled my hair affectionately.’
    • ‘Emily smiled down at her son and ruffled his hair affectionately.’
    • ‘Ruth ruffled Elizabeth's hair affectionately, much to the girls' annoyance.’
    • ‘She ruffled Will's hair affectionately and smiled at me.’
    • ‘He ruffled her hair affectionately, and then, as if at an afterthought, pulled her close into a hug.’
    • ‘Before she could stop herself, she had leaned over and ruffled his blond hair affectionately.’
    • ‘I smiled and ruffled his hair, messing it up even more.’
    • ‘Juliet ruffles his hair, destroying the very conscious disorder Benny strove to achieve.’
    • ‘The father laughs and jovially ruffles his son's hair.’
    • ‘These are your family men who ruffle their kids' hair and leave for office everyday in their neat clothes.’
    • ‘She ruffled his pale blonde hair, laughing when he jerked away.’
    • ‘She kissed him on the forehead and ruffled his already messy hair.’
    disarrange, tousle, dishevel, rumple, run one's fingers through, make untidy, tumble, riffle, disorder
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    1. 1.1(of a bird) erect (its feathers) in anger or display.
      ‘they warbled incessantly, their throat feathers ruffled’
      • ‘It would just sit there, ruffle its clipped wing feathers and continue its neurotic seed shovelling and beak swinging.’
      • ‘Just then, a bird beside him ruffled its wings and flew away.’
      • ‘Fortunately, the bird only ruffled a few of its feathers.’
      • ‘For several minutes, she took to staring at a bird sitting on a telephone wire, ruffling its wings.’
      • ‘The birds become lethargic, with a staggered gait, their feathers are ruffled, and the comb and wattles turn dark red or blackish.’
      • ‘He stares at me with beady eyes, occasionally ruffling his feathers and tilting his head from side to side.’
    2. 1.2Disturb the smoothness or tranquillity of.
      ‘the evening breeze ruffled the surface of the pond in the yard’
      • ‘As when a breeze ruffles the surface of a reflecting pool, ripples ran rapidly across her vision, momentarily distorting the figures.’
      • ‘A strong breeze ruffles the surface of the lake.’
      • ‘A light onshore breeze ruffled the surface of the bay, a few feet away I watched a turkey buzzard or vulture fly by.’
      • ‘Hiking a slope to the east, I rose above one of the world's great mountain scenes, trout leaping in the lazy creek and a breeze ruffling the spruce trees.’
      • ‘It is somehow extremely loud and is followed by a long moment of utter silence and calm during which the breeze gently ruffles the pleated hem of the woman's blue burqa.’
      • ‘A slight breeze ruffles the new leaves on the trees and discovers a discarded morning newspaper on a bench.’
      • ‘I was contemplating opening my window to see if there was a breeze to ruffle my curtains when I heard it.’
      • ‘He gave her an incredulous stare and continued pulling her towards the window, which was still open, the soft breeze ruffling the curtains.’
      • ‘He stared out over the ocean, the breeze ruffling his clothing.’
      • ‘The outside air breezed in, ruffling women's dresses in the process.’
      • ‘That night, when it was quiet, and all that could be heard was the slight hush of a breeze ruffling the trees' leaves.’
      • ‘It was an exquisite fall day, drenched in sunlight with a soft breeze ruffling the brightly colored leaves.’
      • ‘Everyone was quiet; the only thing heard was the slight breeze ruffling the leaves.’
      • ‘The next morning I woke to sun shining on my face and a soft breeze ruffling the curtains.’
      • ‘The air was warm and a slight breeze ruffled the trees.’
      • ‘A breeze ruffled the grass, and raised waves through the pasture.’
      • ‘Someone had opened a window and the cool morning breeze drifted in and ruffled the white hospital curtains.’
      • ‘A cool night breeze ruffled the curtains of the window and swept in a fragrance of spicy earth.’
      • ‘Snorkel early in the day, before Hawaii's trade winds ruffle the surface and stir up sand in the water, which reduces visibility.’
      • ‘Now that there was a light breeze ruffling through the flags the castle seemed more intimidating now.’
      make ripples in, ripple, riffle, roughen
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    3. 1.3Disconcert or upset the composure of (someone)
      ‘Brian had been ruffled by her questions’
      • ‘I was ruffled and quickly reacted by sending up the windows.’
      • ‘I was briefly ruffled, because few things are held as closely and protectively as one's musical preferences.’
      • ‘Yet she has never allowed petty jealousies to ruffle her.’
      • ‘The officials are keenly aware they risk ruffling customers by straying outside the boundaries of its conservative styling.’
      • ‘She could tell that he was ruffled, but he wasn't able to come up with anything to say until she was clearly out of his radius.’
      • ‘She was ruffled by the King's unchanging expression and tone of voice.’
      • ‘He was easily ruffled, which led to tension headaches and high blood pressure.’
      • ‘Instead of looking at the big picture, we became unduly ruffled by near-term issues.’
      • ‘If he should rage, his act will not ruffle me, for I shall play the wise man's part and practice a smooth-tempered self-control!’
      • ‘It didn't ruffle him in the slightest; if anything, his smile broadened.’
      • ‘It was nice to know that something could ruffle the pompous guard.’
      • ‘It would take someone a lot more important than you to ruffle me.’
      • ‘Nothing seemed to ruffle him and, what he may have lacked in attentiveness, he made up in luck.’
      • ‘Aaron had been so cool and composed a moment ago, as if nothing in the world could ruffle him.’
      • ‘Normally nothing ruffled his composure, and yet there he was, blushing like a callow youth at the sight of her ankle.’
      • ‘Perhaps that's the problem; her singing is almost always sunny - violent emotions don't ruffle her composure for long.’
      • ‘His reaction to the film, reportedly based on the life of his father, is in keeping with his nature - the question does not ruffle his equanimity.’
      • ‘Great champions are often ruffled, sometimes shaken, but never spooked.’
      annoy, irritate, irk, vex, nettle, needle, anger, exasperate
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noun

  • 1A strip of lace or other material, gathered along one edge to make an ornamental frill on a garment or other piece of fabric.

    ‘The garment is often trimmed with lace, ruffles, bows and ribbons, optionally with spaghetti straps.’
    • ‘Scalloped edges, lace and ruffles infuse the clothes with motion and make for an exciting silhouette.’
    • ‘He wore pitch-black pants and a black shirt with understated ruffles at the neck and sleeves.’
    • ‘Corsages, ruffles, patches, rosettes, ribbons, buttons, rivets and safety pins are all very popular with fashion folk this summer.’
    • ‘Detailing on the waistline was simple, yet classic, a departure from the days when clothes having excessive lace and ruffles were considered the in-thing.’
    • ‘It's almost a throw-back to the 19th Century of ruffles and lace.’
    • ‘Once it had been clean and beautiful, with ruffles and lace.’
    • ‘My very favorite skirt has a subtle ruffle along the hem, it's not ultra-girly but it gives it a little something extra.’
    • ‘While I will put my boys in girls' clothes, I do have standards: I avoid ribbons, lace, frilly ruffles, little pink flowers, and sequins.’
    • ‘The arms stopped at the elbow in a double ruffle edged with lace and the whole outfit was set off with a matching choker.’
    • ‘You're a prime candidate for divided skirts, tiered skirts and those with hemline ruffles.’
    • ‘The only shirts I own and wear are completely plain, all without ruffles or frills of any kind - in fact, I would have thought they were totally indistinguishable from men's shirts.’
    • ‘Look out for soft ruffles, velvet ribbons and frills.’
    • ‘She wore a flowing pale yellow skirt with ruffles and a silken blouse with puffed sleeves.’
    • ‘Do not wear blouses with fancy details and ruffles.’
    • ‘And then there was the mix of calico, structured ruffles and sculptural pleats all in one outfit.’
    • ‘It's not like a newborn cares about bows and ruffles, and it's not like she'll grow up any more or less feminine as a result of what she wears.’
    • ‘Edith wore a sweet pink gingham dress with a white ruffle at the hem and a white apron.’
    • ‘She appeared in a white suit jacket with an apricot blouse and a prim ruffle down the front.’
    • ‘His shirt had a few ruffles on it and his pants were short.’
    frill, flounce, ruff, ruche, jabot, furbelow
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  • 2A vibrating drumbeat.

    ‘The ruffle on drums and the flourish on bugles are sounded together, up to four times depending on the prominence of the deceased.’
    • ‘They started with the sounding of a bugle, leading in to a drum ruffle from the drum corps, and then swinging into their rock group performance.’

Phrases

    ruffle someone's feathers
    • Cause someone to become annoyed or upset.

      ‘she's never let a client ruffle her feathers’
      • ‘tampering with the traditional approach would ruffle a few feathers’
      • ‘Jess bumped a side table and sent it crashing to the dusty floor with a clang that shook my eardrums, ruffled my feathers with the irritating vibration, and made every one of us jump.’
      • ‘It's this snobbish attitude toward work place interaction that ruffles my feathers.’
      • ‘It's been a difficult week for the committee that devised the rules, but not one that ruffled their feathers unduly.’
      • ‘We seem to have at last ruffled their feathers and could be a force to be reckoned with.’
      • ‘I would appear to have ruffled Mr Foxcroft's feathers in my letter of May 20.’
      • ‘Was Hannity trying to ruffle Jensen's feathers, knock him off balance in order to get him to react in anger?’
      • ‘They think this high profile meeting in London will ruffle his feathers.’
      • ‘She describes herself as a patient driver and even the ‘see a space and fill it’ mentality of London drivers fails to ruffle her feathers.’
      • ‘I felt that I'd ruffled his feathers up enough for the day, or at the very least a few hours.’
      • ‘All of this speculation has clearly ruffled Parker's feathers a little.’
      annoy, irritate, irk, vex, nettle, needle, anger, exasperate
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): of unknown origin. Current noun senses date from the mid 17th century.