Meaning of scaldy in English:

scaldy

Pronunciation /ˈskɔːldi/

nounplural noun scaldies

(also scaldie)
Irish
  • A young bird that has just fledged.

    ‘the magpie sometimes raids nests for eggs and scaldies’
    • ‘We had been careful to leave the garage door open that spring, making sure not to disturb the mother and her wee scaldies.’
    • ‘I was horrified to see a magpie emerge with a scaldie in its beak, holding it by its legs.’
    • ‘The farmer is playing nursemaid to a cheeky grey wagtail and her family of four scaldies.’
    • ‘The never-ending rains have thinned out the scaldies.’
    • ‘If it's a real cold spell, the parent birds go back to the Mediterranean, never minding the poor scaldies in the nest.’

adjective

(also scaldie)
Irish
  • (of a person) small, thin, and having very short or thin hair.

    ‘the child is a scaldy little thing’
    • ‘One man, looking at the scaldy appearance of the cock, said "Sure he's not worth botherin' about."’
    • ‘There's a scaldy looking woman inspecting the car.’
    • ‘It might stop him looking scaldy whenever a camera is pointed at him.’
    • ‘As a kid, I'd always see myself as a small fat scaldy looking girl.’
    • ‘The plants may look a little scaldy at first, but this trimming will encourage a more compact habit of growth.’

Origin

Early 20th century from obsolete or dialect scalled, scald and Scots scad ‘scabby’; probably ultimately from Old Norse skalle ‘bald head’.