Meaning of scalp in English:

scalp

noun

  • 1The skin covering the head, excluding the face.

    ‘hair tonics will improve the condition of your hair and scalp’
    • ‘Sometimes, this fungus can cause our scalps to shed skin cells too quickly.’
    • ‘Medically speaking, it is a condition where the skin cells on the scalp go into over drive and are produced in excess, which gives rise to irritation and itching.’
    • ‘Dandruff is characterised by small, loose flakes of dead skin on the scalp or trapped in the hair.’
    • ‘It's normal for your scalp's skin cells to grow old, die and shed.’
    • ‘Not only will you walk away with clean and clear skin and a massaged scalp, but you'll also learn proper shaving techniques.’
    • ‘Ringworm isn't a worm, but a fungal infection of the scalp or skin that got its name from the ring or series of rings that it can produce.’
    • ‘Dandruff of the scalp and flaking skin in the auditory canals are also common.’
    • ‘The natural process of sloughing off old skin cells on the scalp and manufacturing replacements is usually very orderly and complete.’
    • ‘His brown shoulder length hair was thinning at the scalp and his skin seemed pale and sickly in garish torchlight.’
    • ‘All the hairs on her arms stood straight out from her skin and her scalp tingled.’
    • ‘Using his fingertips to tickle my skin and massage my scalp, he opened up my playful side within a few minutes.’
    • ‘Have the temperature changes made your skin itchy and your scalp dry?’
    • ‘This is probably something to do with us having two to three thousand nerve endings in our scalp crying out for stimulation.’
    • ‘On examination we observed a healthy man with no other burns of the skin of the scalp, face or neck.’
    • ‘Brush her scalp thoroughly but gently, working out from the scalp to the ends of the hair.’
    • ‘On physical examination, no clinically atypical or suspicious nevi were observed on the skin or scalp.’
    • ‘Its natural foaming quality also makes it a gentle, moisturizing cleanser for skin, scalp and hair.’
    • ‘The energy prickled across my skin, and by the funny feelings on my scalp, I was sure my hair was standing on end.’
    • ‘But your scalp needs to be cared for just like the skin on the rest of your body.’
    • ‘The base should actually lay on the scalp and should not be spread or rubbed into the skin or scalp.’
    1. 1.1historical The scalp with the hair belonging to it, cut or torn away from an enemy's head as a battle trophy, a former practice among North American Indians.
      • ‘Young Pawnee warriors proudly stole horses and scalps from their enemies, the Sioux.’
      • ‘The differences between what happened at Fort William Henry and at Niagara need not be seen as evolutionary; the aftermath of battle had yielded many scalps and prisoners for the Iroquois at Niagara.’
      • ‘After the Indians killed soldiers, they would take their scalps as trophies.’
      • ‘The payment for Indian scalps, including the scalps of Indian children, was written in the laws of Massachusetts.’
    2. 1.2British Used with reference to the defeat of an opponent.
      ‘in rugby Gloucester claimed the scalp of would-be champions Bath’
      • ‘In Thailand the internet has nurtured an unprecedented civic consciousness and a new anti-corruption watchdog has claimed the scalp of the interior minister.’
      • ‘They have also already claimed the scalp of Lazio.’
      • ‘But for the on-loan Welshman, United would already have claimed the scalp of Martin O'Neill's men this term.’
      • ‘Singh then claimed the scalp of Jason Gillespie, who walked after he mis-timed a sweep shot, sending the ball gently to Yuvraj.’
      • ‘In his semi-final Grantown's MacLean claimed the scalp of Czech internationalist Pavel Buran.’
      • ‘The Islanders have already claimed the scalp of Premier side Inveraray.’
      • ‘The scandal caused a series of resignations from the National's board and also claimed the scalp of its Chief Executive Officer.’
      • ‘A week earlier they caused a mild upset defeating Clonad in the league, now in the space of seven days they have claimed the scalp of two long established hurling powers.’
      • ‘As an aside, RSL skipper Jeff Whitmore claimed the scalp of West captain Jeremy Biggs, run out for two.’
      • ‘The restructuring claimed the scalp of the bank's chief executive and resulted in a boardroom clear-out.’
      • ‘Most of the top 16 players in the sport dreaded drawing Ashby as an opponent, fearing that she would eventually claim a scalp at this level.’
      • ‘Last week, Craig Brewster, the Inverness manager, claimed defeating the Edinburgh side was more of a scalp than the Old Firm.’
      • ‘He claimed the notable scalp of Athens bronze medallist David Davies, in the 400 metres freestyle.’
      • ‘Howell was joined in the last eight by Padraig Harrington, who claimed a notable scalp in beating Vijay Singh.’
      • ‘They took several notable scalps in the process, particularly those of Sale, Bolton and Preston.’
      • ‘Both players have taken some big scalps en route to the final.’
      • ‘And it was Lyons' first major scalp.’
      • ‘Shaun Pollock added the scalp of Robert Key, but it was too little, too late.’
      • ‘He then held his nerve to claim his biggest scalp.’
      • ‘We are no longer in the business of taking the odd big scalp or doing reasonably well.’
  • 2Scottish A bare rock projecting above surrounding water or vegetation.

verb

[with object]
  • 1historical Take the scalp of (an enemy)

    ‘none of the soldiers were scalped’
    • ‘This squares with the team song, which goes on about scalping the enemy and other warrior skills, befitting for a game of violence, which football clearly is (I speak as a fan).’
    • ‘Historians Hippocrates and Herodotus thought that the Amazons had to fight until they had scalped three enemies before they were permitted to mate.’
    • ‘Where almost all the bodies of the Cavalry soldiers had been scalped the bodies of Keogh and Custer were not harmed apart from their battle wounds.’
    • ‘Jesse James, who used to scalp his victims, seems to prove the point.’
    • ‘Incredibly, the killer appears to be emulating an American Indian warrior, scalping his victims, after murdering them with an axe.’
    1. 1.1informal Punish severely.
      ‘if I ever heard anybody doing that I'd scalp them’
      • ‘I would like feedback on this new project I'm working on though, without posting it preferably, because I have a feeling I'd be scalped for starting something new when I'm working on this.’
      • ‘He carefully moved aside papers; he knew if he messed up his mother's work she'd scalp him.’
      penalize, discipline, mete out punishment to, bring someone to book, teach someone a lesson, make an example of
  • 2North American informal Resell (shares or tickets) at a large or quick profit.

    ‘tickets were scalped for forty times their face value’
    • ‘Last spring, fans scalped tickets at Boston-New York spring training games!’
    • ‘Bobby began his working life scalping tickets to Boston Celtics games and ended up buying the hallowed parquet floor of the Boston Garden before it was torn down.’
    • ‘Tickets were being scalped for $200, and commemorative pins were sold to mark the occasion.’
    • ‘He said this process to access tickets is normal for international games for all World Cups - be they cricket or football - so that all fans have an opportunity to access tickets and to avoid scalping.’
    • ‘People have been scalping tickets for her shows at Carnegie Hall - now that is hitting the big time for the pianist-singer from Nanaimo!’
    • ‘The Chicago Cubs scalp their own tickets (and apparently it's legal).’
    • ‘We scalped two tickets and had a decent hummus dinner for about $20 each.’
    • ‘Kara told me to suck it up and go and scalp your ticket.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting the skull or cranium): probably of Scandinavian origin.

Pronunciation

scalp

/skalp/