Main meanings of scrieve in English

: scrieve1scrieve2scrieve3

scrieve1

Pronunciation /skriːv/

noun

  • 1Scottish A piece of writing; a letter or its contents; a document. In later use sometimes: specifically a letter or other piece of writing used by a beggar to appeal for money.

    From the 19th to the mid 20th century also in wider slang use outside Scotland.

  • 2 slang, archaic, rare Originally Scottish. A promissory note or a banknote; specifically one that is forged or counterfeit. Later also as a mass noun: paper money. Compare "screen".

  • 3 rare A pointed tool used for scoring or engraving wood; = "scribe".

  • 4Shipbuilding
    Any of the lines or grooves incised on a scrive board, which mark out the body plan of a ship or boat.

Origin

Late 16th century. From scrieve.

Main meanings of scrieve in English

: scrieve1scrieve2scrieve3

scrieve2

Pronunciation /skriːv/

verb

  • 1To write. Also with object: to write (something). Chiefly Scottish in later use.

    In Scottish use formerly sometimes associated with the (lowly) work of a clerk.

  • 2 rare To engrave or inscribe (a surface or object); to inscribe or incise (letters, symbols, etc.) on a surface or object. Usually in passive.

  • 3Shipbuilding
    To mark out or incise (the outlines of the body plan of a ship or boat) in full size on a wooden platform, using a pointed tool. Also with in or out. Compare "scribe", scrieve board . Now chiefly historical.

Origin

Late Middle English; earliest use found in Ipotis. Partly (i) from Anglo-Norman and Middle French escriv-, stem (e.g. in present plural and present subjunctive) of Anglo-Norman escrier, also escrivre, escriver, Anglo-Norman and Middle French escrire (French écrire) to write, set out in writing, to draw, paint, decorate, to describe, to enrol, to engrave, inscribe from classical Latin scrībere.

Main meanings of scrieve in English

: scrieve1scrieve2scrieve3

scrieve3

Pronunciation /skriːv/

verb

rare Scottish
  • To move or glide along swiftly. Frequently with adverbs or prepositions, as across, on, over, etc.

Origin

Late 18th century; earliest use found in Robert Burns (1759–1796), poet. Origin uncertain. Perhaps the reflex of a borrowing from early Scandinavian.