Meaning of sextuple in English:

sextuple

Pronunciation /ˈsɛkstjʊp(ə)l/ /sɛksˈtjuːp(ə)l/

adjective

attributive
  • 1Consisting of six parts or things.

    ‘But the legendary creations disappeared in July, when Rosa, a married, 60-year-old father of two, underwent sextuple heart bypass surgery.’
    1. 1.1Six times as much or as many.
      • ‘But a 10-foot birdie putt on the 376-yard 15th put Goosen back in sole possession of top spot and he then safely negotiated a final hole which an hour earlier had seen Swede Peter Hedblom put three balls in the water for a sextuple bogey 11.’
      • ‘Though Live's still going strong (after this mini-tour, they're going back into the studio to record the follow-up to their latest disc, V, working title VI), they're a bit back from sextuple platinum.’
      • ‘It's tougher to find quadruple, quintuple, and sextuple homophones.’
      • ‘The in-form Spaniard blew his chances by racking up a sextuple bogey at the par-three 11th.’

noun

  • A sixfold number or amount.

verb

[with object]
  • Multiply by six; increase sixfold.

    • ‘Doctors have long known that family history predicts the condition, but a recent study found having a mother with the disease at age 55 or younger sextupled the risk in offspring.’
    • ‘He has also, according to the political parties, nearly sextupled the allowance the royal palace gets from the state.’
    • ‘Her voice, tripled or sextupled in harmony, was the vocal version of his slide-guitar style.’
    • ‘That record of course would be more than sextupled as the years went by.’
    • ‘UK usage has more than sextupled between March and June.’

Origin

Early 17th century from medieval Latin sextuplus, formed irregularly from Latin sex ‘six’, on the pattern of late Latin quintuplus ‘quintuple’.

Pronunciation

sextuple

/ˈsɛkstjʊp(ə)l/ /sɛksˈtjuːp(ə)l/