Main meanings of slaver in English

: slaver1slaver2

slaver1

Pronunciation /ˈsleɪvə/

See synonyms for slaver

Translate slaver into Spanish

noun

  • 1 historical A person who dealt in or owned slaves.

    ‘The sword wielding African slavers that the Europeans dealt with usually kept the women and children to add to their own tribe numbers.’
    • ‘I already told you, I don't deal with slavers.’
    • ‘The winner took away with him as many of the losing tribe as he could manage, and those he could not use were sold to slavers.’
    • ‘Slave trading had been theoretically a capital offence in America since 1820, but no slaver had ever been condemned to death.’
    1. 1.1A ship used for transporting slaves.
      ‘The slave trade within Africa involved very high costs for guarding slaves, transporting them, and feeding them until the slavers from Europe turned up at the port.’
      • ‘Considering Cornado's brand of hospitality, any ship in his service was probable no better than a slaver.’
      • ‘The Trouvadore was a Spanish slaver wrecked near Middle Caicos in 1841.’
      • ‘Political, economic, social, religious, and personal matters at each spot the slaver touched, as well as on the vessel itself, affected the nature of the experience for all concerned.’
      • ‘Some slavers which were altered in this way were sent for re-assay, and a Victorian hallmark will be found on the border and any feet which may have been added.’
      • ‘Jessie then found himself aboard The Moonlight, the slaver with its towering sails and masts, cabins and storage space under the deck.’

Main meanings of slaver in English

: slaver1slaver2

slaver2

See synonyms for slaver

Translate slaver into Spanish

noun

mass noun
  • 1Saliva running from the mouth.

    ‘slaver ran down from a corner of his mouth’
    • ‘Then he lied motionlessly with slaver flowing out of his mouth.’
    • ‘Scholarly and distinguished-looking, he made a most unexpected slaver.’
    • ‘It was believed that serpents, coiling together in a wriggling, writhing mass, generated these glass or paste beads from their slaver and shot them into the air from their hissing jaws.’
    • ‘A drip of his slaver splashed onto my chin and ran down my neck.’
  • 2 archaic Excessive or obsequious flattery.

Pronunciation

slaver

/ˈslavə/ /ˈsleɪvə/

verb

[no object]
  • 1Let saliva run from the mouth.

    ‘the Labrador was slavering at the mouth’
    • ‘Within a manner of half seconds, the wall exploded, and out from among the debris leapt a huge creature with slavering tusked jaws and mean yellow eyes.’
    • ‘It was ordered into a frontal attack as part of a botched tank offensive. As dawn broke, survivors staggered back, ‘haggard, bloodshot-eyed, slavering and rolling their bare-teethed heads’.’
    • ‘It hadn't been in the script that I would have a man's life in my hands or, worse, that he would be slavering into my fingers.’
    • ‘Not one of them was staring at the tutor slavering and leaving long fingernail scratches down his desk.’
    • ‘They may be slavering for beer, but are they prepared to pay a fiver a pint?’
    • ‘He started chewing the police car's tires, biting the bumper and generally snarling and slavering, trying to get at the cops, who chose to stay put with the windows rolled up.’
    • ‘I hadn't been around ice cream trucks in a long time and I had forgotten the way they stopped whenever enough slavering children gathered round to make the wasteful idling of the engine economical.’
    • ‘And in the foreground, a gorilla and a gorilla-sized weta roar and slaver.’
    drool, slobber, dribble, salivate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Show excessive admiration or desire.
      ‘suburbanites slavering over drop-dead models’
      • ‘I don't even know why I'm bothering to post this; it's hardly a secret to anyone that media organizations are slavering over the prospect of war.’
      • ‘While there are those who slaver to bathe in the esteem of others, there are many who do not - especially those who have been taught that all praise and glory and blessing and honor belong to the Lamb of God alone.’
      • ‘Hell, they slaver over the prospect of a kid falling down a well, or a local dog getting braces.’
      • ‘So, how does it feel to have the men of New York slavering at your feet?’
      • ‘You see, she had used up more litres of saliva than a cow per day, slavering at Brad.’

Pronunciation

slaver

/ˈslavə/ /ˈsleɪvə/

Origin

Middle English probably from Low German; compare with slobber.