Main meanings of sledging in English

: sledging1sledging2

sledging1

Pronunciation /ˈslɛdʒɪŋ/

noun

mass nounmainly British
  • The activity of travelling or sliding downhill over snow on a sledge.

    ‘I hope it snows—there's nothing like sledging to give you an appetite for roast turkey and Christmas pud’
    • ‘The path continues back to the southern end of the tarn where there is again a challenging gradient before you leave the gravel track and meet an expanse of sloping grass (good for picnics in summer and sledging in winter).’
    • ‘By the end of the trip, they were proficient at climbing, sledging and survival in Arctic conditions, and had walked more than 100 km in snow shoes.’
    • ‘The spell of freezing weather has already claimed the life of one man who smashed into a tree while sledging.’
    • ‘Many parents travelled further around the county in search of deeper snowfalls and better sledging runs, with Terrington Bank, in Terrington, near Malton, proving to be a popular spot.’
    • ‘Hundreds of people who favoured ice skating over sledging made their way to the Ice Factor, in the Eye of York, which has had two of its busiest days over the festive period.’
    • ‘The new edition of Scotland's award-winning travel bible, which covers everything from the best beaches and the finest fish and chip shops to the spookiest places and the ideal spots for sledging, has seen its largest overhaul to date.’
    • ‘Snowboarding, cross-country and sledging provide variety and it's possible to ski all year round on the glaciers.’
    • ‘The huskies were for a long time an integral part of any Antarctic sledging journey.’
    • ‘It was our first attempt in the field at lashing down the sledges tightly and preparing the skidoos for a full day's sledging.’
    • ‘The area is an all year round resort, with hiking in the summer and sledging/skiing in the winter.’
    • ‘I am told it is an ideal location for sledging and even skiing when snow is on the ground.’

Origin

Mid 19th century from sledge.

Main meanings of sledging in English

: sledging1sledging2

sledging2

Pronunciation /ˈslɛdʒɪŋ/

noun

mass noun informal Cricket
  • The practice of making taunting or teasing remarks to an opposing player, especially a batsman, in order to disturb their concentration.

    • ‘in the wake of the controversial Test match, several cricket experts and fans demanded a ban on sledging’
    • ‘Competition from the other players was tough with plenty of friendly sledging.’
    • ‘The game ended prematurely when his batsmen walked off at the start of their innings amid claims of sledging.’
    • ‘There are other notable chapters, including the section on technique, his best test and one-day selections, and his attitude towards sledging.’
    • ‘Some people were of the view that a sporting team should be allowed to use anything that gave them the upper hand, with others firmly believing that sledging was against the spirit of cricket.’
    • ‘Sure enough, the sledging kicked off in earnest at Bristol in the first NatWest Series encounter between England and Australia.’
    • ‘In 2002, the ICC amended its code of conduct to articulate for the first time the unacceptable levels of sledging.’
    • ‘His style as a captain didn't suit everyone; many thought the determination to win encouraged sledging and bad attitudes on the field.’
    • ‘He admitted with disarming honesty that Australian sledging got to him in 2004.’
    • ‘Believe me, we won't achieve very much next summer unless we are prepared to handle the sledging, because we will be up against people who are past masters at it.’
    • ‘No one actually knows when sledging started, but since time immemorial disparaging remarks have been part of the sport in general - and cricket in particular.’
    • ‘The current ICC ruling on sledging has received a mixed response.’
    • ‘In a sense the sledging, the fact that they needed to resort to it, made us realise that we were a good team.’
    • ‘As a batsman you're never going to win a sledging contest against 11 fielders.’
    • ‘In a sense the sledging, the fact that they needed to resort to it, made us realise that we were a good team.’
    • ‘As a batsman you're never going to win a sledging contest against 11 fielders.’
    • ‘Cricket purists hate sledging.’

Origin

1970s from sledge, originally Australian.