Meaning of snodger in English:

snodger

adjective

informal, dated Australian
  • Very good; first class.

    ‘an absolutely snodger effort’
    • ‘Where the outback meets the tropics is a snodger place.’
    • ‘It was a snodger day! The apple trees was white with bloom. All things seemed good to me.’
    • ‘The snodger whiting weren't biting when Darryl and his mates ventured south.’
    • ‘I felt a solid bump and drove the hooks into a snodger bream.’
    • ‘The next pic is her sister with a snodger snapper.’
    • ‘Anyway, have a snodger time and keep safe.’
    • ‘I am having what boys call a 'snodger' time here.’
    • ‘If you see a very pretty girl passing, you might properly comment that she is snodger.’

noun

informal, dated Australian
  • A person or thing that is exceptionally good.

    ‘we had a snodger of a sunset’
    • ‘'We'll get some snodgers soon,' Russell says.’
    • ‘Some guys have landed real snodgers.’
    • ‘He was a big snodger — a nice bloke but always getting into strife.’
    • ‘It was also noted that our top-producing heifer had once again brought in a snodger of a calf.’
    • ‘The club had a snodger of a weekend.’
    • ‘I didn't realise it was a world record, but I knew it was a snodger.’
    • ‘He declared it to be a snodger of a day.’
    • ‘On the bottom hook was a snodger of a trout.’
    • ‘Chris hooked another snodger as did one of the other lads.’

Origin

Early 20th century of unknown origin; perhaps related to Scots and northern English dialect snod ‘neat, tidy, trim, spruce’.

Pronunciation

snodger

/ˈsnɒdʒə/