Main meanings of sod in English

: sod1sod2

sod1

Pronunciation /sɒd/

Translate sod into Spanish

noun

the sod
  • 1The surface of the ground, with the grass growing on it; turf.

    ‘underneath the sod was a layer of humus’
    • ‘I chunked my stuff on the sod and lay down next to it.’
    • ‘Heavy grazing the previous fall is essential to weaken and open up the sod when tillage or chemical control of the sod are not used.’
    • ‘Put plastic runners on both sides of the trench to avoid damage to your lawn, one runner for the sod and the other runner for the dirt.’
    • ‘Look for 1,480 trees, 87,000 shrubs and sod to cover the equivalent of seven football fields.’
    • ‘Isabella felt like a chunk of sod when an earthworm burrows into it.’
    • ‘A dense sod of the drop-seed grass, Sporobolus flexuosus, characterizes this area.’
    • ‘The seeds are also spread by way of composted manure, grass seed, sod, or hay, as well as by deer and other wildlife.’
    • ‘Fans are trying to pull down the goal posts or tear a piece of history from the Ohio Stadium sod, and cops are shooting pepper spray at anything that moves.’
    • ‘Such are the quality of modern day pitches like Hyde Park, a couple of rain-free hours could help turn a water-logged sod into a playable surface.’
    • ‘Next, he removed the sod and soil and added a thin layer of gravel.’
    • ‘After removing the sod, till the area and break up the compacted soil.’
    • ‘Removing the sod creates a recess in the soil, resulting in poor drainage.’
    • ‘If you choose to plant your crowns in your lawn, you'll have to remove the sod with a garden shovel.’
    • ‘Despite the horrific rain of the previous two days the Timahoe sod provided a perfect surface which contributed to make this game so enjoyable.’
    • ‘The installation of the ProGrass playing surface begins with the removal of the natural grass and sod on the field.’
    • ‘The eggs are laid one or more inches below the soil surface in sod or patches of grassy weeds in cropland areas.’
    • ‘Without the seasonal harvesting, plowing and planting, a mature sod of grasses and clovers would cover the earth and enable the soil to hold moisture better.’
    • ‘Remove existing lawn by slicing under the sod with a spade and cutting it into manageable pieces.’
    • ‘Rake and mow the lawn if it needs it, and be sure to check for cranefly larvae under the sod if you noticed large mosquito-looking critters randomly flying about last fall.’
    • ‘Gravity, spatial distance, trees across the road and large rocks under the sod all tell me, in effect, that I cannot have what I want, or at least that I cannot have it without struggle or a lapse of time.’
    turf, greenery, green, sod
    1. 1.1A piece of turf.
      ‘I was to retire before even the first sod was turned’
      • ‘Remove dead patches along with 3 to 4 inches of soil underneath; fill the hole with a fresh piece of sod, as shown above, or overseed.’
      • ‘Then either seed, plant new plugs, or insert a fresh piece of sod cut to fit the damaged area.’
      • ‘You can make an instant lawn of buffalo grass using sod, or for a fraction of the cost and a couple months of establishment time, use seed.’
      • ‘Make sure that the sod you are having installed contains varieties of grass that are indigenous to your region.’
      • ‘The green contours are also lay-of-the-land and the bunkers are hand-dug, some edged by tall layers of stacked sod, others by shaggy tufts of native grass.’
      • ‘If your lawn is bluegrass, if your lawn was started from sod, or if you use chemical fertilizer, you almost certainly have a thick build-up of thatch.’
      • ‘They then patched the back of the green with sod from their on-site nursery.’
      • ‘This isn't a problem when installing a new green, as the spores can be tilled into the soil prior to seeding or can be applied to the surface before rolling out carpet sod.’
      • ‘Painstaking effort goes into matching the seams between the strips of sod and the adjoining turf.’
      • ‘The greens were constructed out of a topsoil mix and they used only four truckloads of sod to lay one strip around all greens and some of the bunkers.’
      • ‘Cut one or more lengths of sod, as needed, and lay it in place.’
      • ‘Even though it was still only late February some buds were already poking through the brown earth and the lawn looked as if it had just been laid from sod.’
      • ‘They cut out the portion where the sod would grow and outlined the shape with bender-board.’
      • ‘Willie knows the techniques; how you balance the sod, break the sod and so on.’
      • ‘For extreme cases you can line the yard with chicken wire and put a layer of sod over that.’
      • ‘Start laying your sod along walkways, sidewalks and driveways near your house.’
      • ‘Visitors were also invited to turn a sod of turf.’
      • ‘In 1966, Luke used a silver spade to turn the first sod.’
      • ‘Oliver Clery, turned the first sod for the project on Tuesday of this week.’
      • ‘Most Greenlandic homes are constructed of stone, sod, or wood.’

verbverb sods, verb sodding, verb sodded

[with object] rare
  • Cover with sods or pieces of turf.

    ‘the stadium has been sodded’
    • ‘After construction was completed, we installed the remaining plants and sodded the lawn.’
    • ‘We planted and sodded the lawn and installed an irrigation system throughout.’

Phrases

    under the sod
    • Dead and buried in a grave.

      ‘On April 10, 1943, Lees-Milne wrote, ‘I would like this diary to entertain two or three generations ahead when I am under the sod.’’
      • ‘He has property enough to make us independent but that will be valuable only, when we are under the Sod.’
      • ‘Time will run to seed when we are under the sod; there'll be time enough and to spare then.’

Origin

Late Middle English from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German sode, of unknown ultimate origin.

Main meanings of sod in English

: sod1sod2

sod2

Pronunciation /sɒd/

Translate sod into Spanish

noun

  • 1mainly British vulgar slang An unpleasant or obnoxious person.

    scoundrel, villain, rogue, rascal, brute, animal, weasel, snake, monster, ogre, wretch, devil, good-for-nothing, reprobate, wrongdoer, evil-doer
    1. 1.1with adjective A person of a specified kind.
      human being, individual, man, woman, human, being, living soul, soul, mortal, creature, fellow
    2. 1.2Something that is difficult or causes problems.
  • 2 derogatory, dated A gay man.

    gay person, queer person, lesbian, gay

verbverb sods, verb sodding, verb sodded

vulgar slang mainly British with object, usually in imperative
  • Used to express one's anger or annoyance at someone or something.

Phrases

    sod all
    British vulgar slang
    • Absolutely nothing.

Phrasal Verbs

    sod off
    British vulgar slang
    • usually in imperative Go away (used to angrily dismiss someone).

Origin

Early 19th century abbreviation of sodomite.