Meaning of take a bite out of in English:

take a bite out of

phrase

informal
  • Reduce by a significant amount.

    • ‘commissions that can take a bite out of your retirement funds’
    • ‘It is not clear precisely how long that period was, but it clearly takes a bite out of that 9 month period.’
    • ‘Energy costs are taking a bite out of household budgets, especially for lower-income families.’
    • ‘It must have seemed like Groundhog Day, as problems at his American West Coast subsidiary Pacificorp took a bite out of the Glasgow utility's share price.’
    • ‘The extreme drought conditions in parts of the Corn Belt took a bite out of its crops, the government cutting its estimates for corn and soybeans by 12 and 11 percent nationally.’
    • ‘They want to see the police taking a bite out of the crime situation.’
    • ‘From our economics 101 textbooks, we remember that high oil prices act as a tax for consumers by slowing down consumer spending, which eventually takes a bite out of growth.’
    • ‘Expansion into New York takes a bite out of Pret A Manger profits.’
    • ‘The Edmonton Police Service is looking for a few good men and women - around 100 per year for the next several years - to take a bite out of crime.’
    • ‘Distribution costs take a bite out of the revenue, as does the cost of the Red Hat Network sub.’
    • ‘If the price of fueling their vehicles truly took a bite out of their household budget, consumers would be buying vehicles that get much better fuel economy.’