Meaning of the gaiety of nations in English:

the gaiety of nations

phrase

often ironic British
  • General cheerfulness or amusement.

    ‘editors added to the gaiety of nations by suing each other’
    • ‘I do feel I've contributed to the gaiety of nations and I can't deny I get a vibe out of all the acclaim.’
    • ‘It has also added a little to the gaiety of nations.’
    • ‘All of this is fine and adds to the gaiety of nations but, oh, those terrible songs.’
    • ‘It is a strange career to look back upon; a career associated, throughout, with the gaiety of nations.’
    • ‘His distinctive contribution to the gaiety of nations has been to discern high comedy in the low compromises of kitsch.’
    • ‘British Euro-skepticism may irritate others, but let's be fair - it has much contributed to the gaiety of nations.’
    • ‘I am sure your government merely intended to contribute some homespun humor to the general gaiety of nations, as Queen Marie Antoinette so famously did in her day.’
    • ‘As part of my contribution to the gaiety of nations, I'll tell you what he told me.’
    • ‘It was certainly not because, as a smiling friend suggested, I imagined I was thereby adding to the gaiety of nations.’
    • ‘April has added to the gaiety of nations - dancing on tables, drinking champagne from slippers at dawn, hurtling around in fast cars with louche aristocrats.’