Main meanings of troth-plight in English

: troth-plight1troth-plight2troth-plight3

troth-plight1

noun

archaic, rare
  • The act of plighting troth; a solemn promise or engagement, especially of marriage; betrothal; = troth-plighting .

Origin

Late Middle English; earliest use found in John Gower (d. 1408), poet. In some forms from troth + plight.

Pronunciation

troth-plight

/ˈtrəʊθˌplʌɪt/ /ˈtrɒθˌplʌɪt/

Main meanings of troth-plight in English

: troth-plight1troth-plight2troth-plight3

troth-plight2

adjective

archaic, rare
  • Bound by a solemn promise or engagement, especially of marriage; engaged, betrothed.

Origin

Middle English; earliest use found in Floris and Blauncheflur. In some forms from truth + plight, past participle of plight.

Pronunciation

troth-plight

/ˈtrəʊθˌplʌɪt/ /ˈtrɒθˌplʌɪt/

Main meanings of troth-plight in English

: troth-plight1troth-plight2troth-plight3

troth-plight3

verb

archaic, rare
  • with object To plight one's troth to (a person); specifically to engage to marry (a person). Compare "troth". Also occasionally: to promise (a person) to do something.

Origin

Late Middle English; earliest use found in Robert Mannyng (d. c1338), poet and historian. In some forms from troth + plight.

Pronunciation

troth-plight

/ˈtrəʊθˌplʌɪt/ /ˈtrɒθˌplʌɪt/