Meaning of uncontentious in English:

uncontentious

Pronunciation /ʌnkənˈtɛnʃəs/

adjective

  • Not causing or likely to cause an argument.

    ‘an uncontentious view’
    • ‘The Steering Group treats this argument as uncontentious.’
    • ‘Suffice it to say that it is not uncontentious that the argument developed earlier is a good way of defending a positive answer to the question ‘Do events exist?’’
    • ‘Now at one level this line of argument seems quite uncontentious.’
    • ‘Certainly, the presentation of the nine bills was downbeat to the point of self-parody; the measures themselves apparently ultracautious and uncontentious.’
    • ‘This is all presented as utterly uncontentious.’
    • ‘In the old-school commercial tradition, it exists to provide much-loved shows in a straightforward and uncontentious manner.’
    • ‘The idea that aerosols both increase albedo and promote cloud formation (further reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the earth's surface) is uncontentious.’
    • ‘Accordingly, the view that government would be better off regulating rather than owning various key utilities, including media and telecommunications, is now ideologically uncontentious.’
    • ‘That is all uncontentious I take it?’
    • ‘Any implicit background assumption that society or the public interest can be conceived of as an uncontentious, unified and homogeneous whole is not acceptable.’
    • ‘So, in that sense, I hoped you would find that sort of thing uncontentious, because, again, this is in no way detracting from the quality of the work which you do with your dogs.’
    • ‘Soon, I discovered that one topic was popular, uncontentious, and universally discussed: the weather.’
    • ‘In fact, if you weren't quoting Ignatius J, I'd be wondering at the point of the thread, since what you say seems entirely uncontentious to me.’
    • ‘To a large extent the history is uncontentious.’
    • ‘Often the question at issue will be the application of uncontentious principles of public law to a particular factual situation.’
    • ‘Now, by contrast, light alone has become the uncontentious symbol of an inward, no-logo spirituality.’
    • ‘This relativism is central to the impossibility of finding an uncontentious definition of terrorism.’
    • ‘In the British case, they were also strikingly uncontentious within domestic politics.’
    • ‘I think it's a fairly uncontentious point that doesn't need arguing so much as it needs action.’
    • ‘This is of course to read between the lines, and the matter is not uncontentious.’