Meaning of whop in English:

whop

(North American whap)

verbwhops, whopping, whopped

[with object]informal
  • Hit hard.

    ‘Smith whopped him on the nose’
    • ‘A child doesn't know she has hands or how to use them and in the meantime she'll whap herself in the nose or pull her own hair and wonder why it hurts.’
    • ‘When the big guy finally tired himself out from punching so much, Brewster stepped in and whopped him one.’
    • ‘An unlocked door will come open with unexpected ease and whap me on the nose.’
    • ‘He took a two-by-four and whopped him upside the head.’
    • ‘Papa would have whopped me upside the head if I'd tried that one on for size.’
    • ‘From the free-kick, Jensen whaps it into the wall.’
    • ‘Kuyt, stretching, whapped it straight into Ricardo's chest.’
    • ‘Within a week of arriving at the new academy of learning, he has whapped the hunky gang leader and stolen his girl.’
    • ‘She drowsily opened her eyes and whapped the beeping alarm clock irritably.’
    • ‘He whapped Katheryn playfully, set the folded blanket on the cot and continued.’
    • ‘Just then, Div whapped him on the back of the head with the bottle of carpet cleaner.’
    • ‘There was a guy behind me, and he whopped me on the shoulder with something and crumpled me down.’
    • ‘I whipped around, my hair whapping me in the face.’
    • ‘‘Thanks a lot,’ Miryoku muttered, walking past his brother and whapping him in the head with his book.’
    • ‘She pulled the hat off, whapping Aiden on the chest lightly.’
    • ‘Roxanne completed the sentence, trying to wave her hands around in emphasis and succeeding only in whapping Donny in the face.’
    • ‘Honey chortled, whapping Lily on the back, who almost choked on her food.’
    • ‘Picking up a pillow and promptly whapping him with it, she fell back on the couch.’
    • ‘I whapped him on the head with my pointer and middle finger, ‘You could have gotten hurt.’’
    • ‘He whapped me with a pillow before bounding to my door.’
    cuff, strike, hit, thump, slap, smack, crack, swat, punch, jab, knock, thwack, bang, wallop, batter, pummel, buffet

noun

informal
  • A heavy blow, or the sound of such a blow.

    ‘a loud whop echoed in the still air’
    • ‘She managed to insert a fairly loud whap as her fist connected with his face.’
    • ‘Well, the butterfly took flight, and Digger reached out with his big paw, and gave the butterfly a whap!’
    • ‘Shaking the kinks out of his shoulders, Brake gave the bag an experimental whop.’
    • ‘‘Yes, Mother,’ both Ethan and Max said in a chorus earning whaps on their heads.’
    • ‘He jumps nimbly down and dusts off her dainty foot with three smart whaps of his hand.’
    • ‘He glanced around for a moment, surveying the room… only to get a playful whap on the head by a very familiar hand.’
    • ‘I shoved the nose down, glided in and hit the water with a good whap.’
    • ‘A good kick can do the trick, so ask that quarterback of yours to have his team's punter give you a good whap in the belly.’
    • ‘Meanwhile the sound effects are very well done, with the expected boings and whaps that one would experience in a platformer.’
    cuff, hit, thump, slap, smack, crack, swat, punch, fist, jab, hook, knock, thwack, bang, wallop

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘take or put sharply’): variant of dialect wap ‘strike’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

whop

/wɒp/