Main meanings of wilding in English

: wilding1wilding2

wilding1

noun

mass nouninformal US
  • The activity by a gang of youths of going on a protracted and violent rampage in a public place, attacking or mugging people at random.

    ‘prison put halt to his wilding’
    • ‘Gangs of teens in several big cities have taken to running in packs or wilding.’
    • ‘Teens were wilding in the park, assaulting people at random and creating a tense atmosphere throughout the city.’
    • ‘During a night of so-called wilding, packs of teens terrorized their way through the sanctified Manhattan park like latter-day droogs.’
    • ‘The police announced to a press hungry for sensational crime stories that the young men had been part of a gang of teenagers who were out wilding.’
    • ‘The young men were videotaped by police, implicating each other in the act and at the time, police said the teens were wilding.’
    • ‘Wilding attacks in this country will be a lot like the Central Park wilding attacks.’
    • ‘The music scene there can often feel like a perpetual first day of summer—kids wilding everywhere and not really caring about who they anger.’
    • ‘Two doctors from the university were mugged by a wilding group in a "good neighborhood" walking home after their shift.’
    • ‘The news channel reports on a massive outbreak of wilding in in the city's most prestigious commercial district.’
    • ‘The terrified young defendants were demonized to the point of being described as members of a teenage wolf pack that was wilding in the park.’
    uproar, rampage, furore, tumult, commotion, upheaval, disturbance, street fight, melee, row, scuffle, fracas, fray, affray, brawl, free-for-all

Origin

1980s from the adjective wild+ -ing.

Pronunciation

wilding

/ˈwʌɪldɪŋ/

Main meanings of wilding in English

: wilding1wilding2

wilding2

(also wildling)

noun

  • A wild plant, especially an apple tree descended from cultivated varieties, or its fruit.

    • ‘However, interest in how cultivated plants consort with wildlings had started long before genetic engineering was even a glimmer in a test tube.’
    • ‘The souped-up wildlings set 50 percent more seeds than the regular wild ones did.’
    • ‘All of these, the wildlings and selected forms alike, take up little space, look delightful when interplanted with small spring bulbs, and provide enormous interest at a time when any colour is to be cherished.’

Origin

Early 16th century from the adjective wild+ -ing.

Pronunciation

wilding

/ˈwʌɪldɪŋ/