Meaning of yarraman in English:

yarraman

nounyarramans, yarramen

Australian
  • A horse.

    ‘I can hear a yarraman, I reckon’
    ‘a mob of bush-bred yarramans’
    • ‘Many a time he'd proposed that his own people should adopt the yarraman, explaining how much easier their lives would be if they allowed yarraman to help them as did the white men.’
    • ‘He needn't be frightened o' these yarramans. I got them like lambs.’
    • ‘"Yarraman!" Anne exclaimed, fully alive to the importance of the information. "Do you mean white man's yarraman, Kombo?’
    • ‘Bujeri road, come out other side of mountain; plenty big for yarraman to come through.’
    • ‘Was it the white man's strange animal, the yarraman, whose flesh was poison?’
    • ‘"Only got 'em one yarramen," said the blackfellow nonchalantly.’
    • ‘He had probably ridden well clear, and then jumped off and let the 'yarramen' go.’
    • ‘I asked the elder boy, whom I christened Tommy, if he would come along with me and the yarramans.’
    • ‘I popped Mr. Monkey on one of the sore-backed "Yarramans", and started for the station.’
    • ‘She had only ever before known a hotly breathing, living yarraman, a yarraman that walked and cantered and neighed and shied and bucked.’

Origin

Mid 19th century probably from an Aboriginal language. The word was taken into the early Australian pidgin used by white settlers and Aborigines to communicate with each other; each believed that yarraman was the word for ‘horse’ in the other's language.

Pronunciation

yarraman

/ˈjarəmən/