There are 2 main translations of barrow in Spanish

: barrow1barrow2

barrow1

Pronunciation /ˈbɛroʊ/ /ˈbarəʊ/

noun

  • 1

  • 2British

    (street trader's stall)
    (utilizado como puesto de venta) carretón masculine
    • These were all purchased from street barrows when second-hand books were sold at a cost of about sixpence each.
    • Sold from just about every avenue one could imagine (from shops to basements to barrows in the street), the drink played into the prevalent violence and insecurity in a dramatic and disastrous way.
    • He came to a corner, but she was lost in the crowd around a line of street barrows selling clothing and a little food.
    • A friend of mine had a barrow in Wilton Shopping Centre in Cork but he had nothing to sell.
    • He started a fruit barrow down the bottom of Queen Street.
    • This was a true family business rooted in Balham, for John's brothers Albert and Billy also manned barrows there, while stallholder Bobby Kelly, who died this year aged 97, was a second cousin.
    • In their distinctive uniform, and pushing their information barrows, the Navigators provide everything from directions to city tourist attractions through to where to buy a coffee table.
    • Many market stall operators are second, third or fourth generation families born and bred with the tradition, and have occupied the same pitch with barrows being handed down as part of the legacy.
    • Business boomed and soon the McIvers had over 300 barrows.
    • York's seven Visitor Information Patrols are rolling out their barrows and are ready to welcome tourists to the city.
    • There were some barrows with a political message, like to one containing just a pile of manure with a sign saying Sponsored by Brussels.
    • Pete had a lovely barrow, everything at chest height.
    • The barrow was used from the 1930s to hold Garsons Farm produce which was sold at Borough Market in London Bridge.
    • Usually an alley was an access path wide enough to permit passage of a large barrow or cart from a lot in the interior of a block to a street.
    • Indeed, I could have loaded them all onto a borrowed costermonger's barrow and shifted them myself if I'd needed to.
    • The type of market stalls allowable will include, any wheeled or movable stall or box, barrow or cart.
    • Time was getting on, but, fortunately, there was a flower seller's barrow at the end of the footbridge and I stopped and started to select flowers for a handsome bouquet.
    • Fleet Street was choked with red-headed folk, and Pope's Court looked like a coster's orange barrow.
    • ‘Dollar, dollar, dollar,’ rang through the air from all directions and people huddled around barrows freshly loaded with the end-of-week bargains.
    • This man is selling bottles of soft drink from a barrow.

There are 2 main translations of barrow in Spanish

: barrow1barrow2

barrow2

túmulo, n.

Pronunciation /ˈbɛroʊ/ /ˈbarəʊ/

noun

Archaeology
  • 1

    (grave mound)
    túmulo masculine
    • Across Britain and Ireland there are thousands of Iron Age barrows and burial mounds, and hundreds of Iron Age hill forts.
    • In prehistoric Britain early agricultural communities deposited their dead in communal, highly visible locations such as chambered tombs, barrows and burial cairns.
    • With its prehistoric burial mounds, barrows and encampments, its feudal laws and time-trapped settlements, the New Forest is anything but.
    • There can be few more evocative sites in the British landscape than ancient barrows of the Neolithic and Bronze Ages.
    • Throughout his career since leaving Cambridge he pursued an interest in archaeology, at first studying barrows and burial sites and later hillforts.
    • As in many monument complexes, burials were inserted into existing mounds, and barrows were built among and onto them.
    • In the west country a few burials of this date in stone-lined cists are known, and around the river Humber a localized tradition of inhumation burials under square barrows developed.
    • Believing that associated cremation burials might be lost, archaeologists cleared the barrow to the top of the original earth mound, which was only 50 cm high.
    • Roman-period burials and other finds are fairly common on the sites of Neolithic and Bronze Age barrows.
    • In response, English Heritage funded excavation of the prehistoric barrow mound at Woodnesborough, near Sandwich, in the field where it was uncovered.
    • His activities in the field included excavation, digging into barrows around Stonehenge, and his fieldwork at Stonehenge and Avebury was published in two books in 1740 and 1743.
    • But barrows, tombs, sacred springs, stone circles and surviving customs are satisfactory starting points for the study of non-revealed religious or magical rites.
    • The only comparisons we know are two Early Bronze Age barrows in Northamptonshire, at Irthlingborough, and Gayhurst.
    • There's something other-worldly about the Orkney Islands, with its legions of lichen-clad standing stones, which sprout from ancient barrows against the spectacular northern sky.
    • He was at the burial barrows this morning, he remembers.
    • Nonetheless, three ring ditches, one definitely a barrow, and cremation and inhumation burials - some placed deliberately in the pit alignments - were found amongst the fields.
    • Over 50 site types include stone and timber circles, rows, barrows and tombs of all sorts, surviving and destroyed
    • Human activity on the Plain can be traced back at least 4,000 years - as ancient tracks, barrows (grave-mounds) and field systems testify.
    • The most likely source of destruction is now from badgers which have already caused much damage to barrows, burial sites and other monuments.
    • Similar Bronze Age cemeteries consisting of many small barrows have been found elsewhere in Essex, for example at Ardleigh and Brightlingsea.