There are 3 main translations of buck in Spanish

: buck1buck2buck3

buck1

ciervo (macho), n.

Pronunciation /bək/ /bʌk/

noun

  • 1

    (male)
    (of deer) ciervo (macho) masculine
    (of rabbit) conejo (macho) masculine
    (of hare) liebre macho feminine
    • Some places base the cost of a deer hunt on the size of a buck's antlers - the bigger the antlers, the more the hunt costs.
    • Herein, we consider two main hypotheses to assess the possible function of the post-copulatory vocalization of fallow bucks.
    • When, freezing and exhausted, he finally felt land beneath his limbs, the buck collapsed.
    • Even at the tail end of the season, we were seeing numerous herds of 20 or more antelope marshaled by some very fine quality herd bucks.
    • I saw a beautiful dark-horned buck standing with a doe on a sun-splashed, frost-sparkled flat near the edge of a canyon.
    • They require no hanging, and the meat is pale and tender; that of does is considered better than that of bucks (males).
    • Hunters selectively cull the does to make more forage available for the bucks.
    • Add a host of maturing bucks from a bumper fawn crop six years ago and the potential for trophy-class deer is excellent.
    • The double trigger setup on the Mountain Rifle allows for a quick shot by simply pulling the front trigger should a whitetail buck break cover in front of the hunter.
    • They had red skin, and small horns like a buck's newly sprouting antlers.
    • The most magnificent of these was a buck's head - antlers and all - which was mounted above the fireplace.
    • Growth of an organ, such as a buck's antlers, requires additional nourishment and that means additional blood flow.
    • In central Iowa, purebred bucks and does cost $500 or more per animal.
    • Outdoors enthusiasts who can ignore the season's monster bucks and swarming quail will find excellent largemouth bass action.
    • On the drive back to Shelby a big buck deer jumped across the road only a few yards in front of us.
    • In other words, the owners of the buck deer in Edgar were held as much to the standards of the owner of a domestic animal as that of a wild animal owner.
    • In a year as magical as this one, impressive bucks are scattered throughout the state, but those animals won't be easy to see just now.
    • Just about 15 minutes ago, we're told a white deer - a white buck - was tranquilized and is now being brought for medical treatment.
    • They'd seen three roe deer in the woods, a hind and two bucks, moving ‘silent and in slow motion through the snow’.
    • And it has particularly infuriated park managers because the owner of an Alsatian watched as her dog chased the buck and then fled the scene while the deer died.
    • Marion had never got on with her father, but right now if she saw his face she'd have cheerfully swung the three strong buck rabbits she was carrying into it.
    • During my North Cotswold Mastership, I made Butler, the terrier man, carry a huge white buck ferret on his bicycle, and very useful he proved to be.
    • John, as mentioned at the outset, had two dogs that were almost drowned by a wild buck kangaroo when it took them on in a small reservoir on his family's property.
    • Buck hares are wild frolickers in March, their breeding season, which has made them a synonym for lunacy for centuries.
  • 2archaic

    (dandy)
    petimetre masculine dated
    • For many of the young bucks in their scarlet tunics, what starts as a great imperial adventure ends in either a squalid death or captivity.
    • He's both the wise man and the young buck trying to prove himself.
    • That old cliche of a blend of young bucks and seasoned campaigners was there in abundance.
    • When the boss is gone, the young bucks want to move up and take over.
    • Too many old heads and too many young bucks not having had the time to cut their teeth properly.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (horse/steer) corcovear
    • The horse was small, but it was sturdy, and it suddenly started bucking and plunging in a manner that would have done a bronco proud.
    • Proper dental care has eliminated dangerous behaviors such as bolting, flipping over backwards, and bucking in a number of my clients' horses.
    • The gelding had almost bucked her off several times, and all we had done was walk and trot.
    • The young stallion was bucking and rearing, trying to get the man off his back.
    • Lopez dislocated a shoulder when his mount, Quoit Alarming, bucked and unseated him during the first race at Monmouth Park on September 11.
    • Suddenly he began to buck, throwing me around like a rag doll.
    • Unfortunately, the horse bucked and she was thrown to the ground.
    • There were no horses bucking in their stalls, no chickens clucking on the ground.
    • In order for a horse to buck, it has to lower its head and slow its pace to bring both hind legs together and underneath to gain enough power to push upwards.
    • Sarah mounted a horse and it bucked, throwing her into the air.
    • Yes, I rode a horse, got bucked off and that was the last time I will ever get near a horse.
    • His hair stood on end, as if he'd been running his hands through it; ink stained one finger; and he had the wild-eyed look of a horse about to start bucking.
    • Croft's horse bucked; Croft tugged on the reins and backed away.
    • When the horse bucks you, you pick yourself up, dust yourself off and get right back on.
    • The startled horse bucked again and let out a whinny as the rider held tight to the reigns and tugged back.
    • The Parker boy had broken his arm when he was bucked off a horse.
    • Suddenly, his horse bucked and Henry nearly fell off.
    • Her horse reared, its eyes rimmed with white as it bolted away, the other three riderless horses bucked until their tethers snapped and galloped after it.
    • She was about to lead the three-year-old in from the paddock when another horse in the yard unsettled him and he bucked, kicking Blanche under the jaw and knocking her unconscious.
    • Ben's horse was bucking and Ben was hanging on tight so he wouldn't get thrown.
  • 2US

    (move jerkily)
    (car/deck) dar sacudidas
    • I couldn't avoid them all, and the ship bucked and heaved under me as more rocks than I would like to count peppered our outer hull.
    • The boat bucked and spun and entered the rapids.
    • The truck bucked violently as the shock wave slammed against it, and Ian was pelted with small stones and dust, first from behind, then a split second later from the opposite direction.
    • The rafts bucked under us, bobbing and tilting.
    • He forgot his musing when the Blue Horizon banked to the starboard and then suddenly bucked upward.
    • Diving into turn one at over 120 mph, the rough track had the bike bucking around some.
    • The raft bucked to one side, and for one terrible moment it seemed that it would spill all the way over.
    • As I pushed the bike closer to the limit a problem emerged: even though the suspension was working as hard as it could, the bike began to buck beneath me.
    • As the current funnels through a gauntlet of rhino-sized rocks, our pair of six-metre rafts plunge and buck like paper cups in a storm drain.
    • The first hundred yards of the tunnel were the worst - the road was heavily cratered, and our vehicles bucked and shuddered wildly, spraying snowmelt into the blackness.
    • A few seconds later and the car began to buck and slide out of control.
    • It also takes a great deal of leg strength for explosive sprints on the flat sections, and a great deal of upper body strength just to control the bike as it bucks under you.
    • At that moment the ship bucked and smashed over to one side.
    • The ship shuddered and bucked but no damage was taken.
    • As the bullets chewed through the surface each helicopter bucked as it took the weight of the shell, and Paul uttered a brief murmur to himself as their car accelerated toward the gate, hoping the helicopters could take the load.
    • The vessel bucked and swerved as the upper atmosphere began to tug and grab at the smooth underside of the glider-car.
    • But then the ship bucked as missiles rained from above.
    • The tall ship bucked hard to the side, then back down again.
    • An instant later several more bursts of fire followed, and the ship bucked into the air and then smashed back down, its landing struts sheering off completely.
    • I could feel the ship trembling and bucking while Maura tried to keep it under control.
  • 3

    (resist, oppose)
    to buck against sth/sb rebelarse contra algo/algn
    to buck against -ing resistirse a + inf
    to buck at -ing resistirse a + inf

transitive verb

US
  • 1

    (trend) resistirse a
    (trend) oponerse a
    to buck the system ir contra la corriente
    • European bourses ended the week in the red yesterday, but the Irish market bucked the trend managing to stay ahead throughout the day's trading.
    • The outgoing chief executive still believes you cannot buck the market.
    • But whenever coaches buck conventional wisdom, they face intense scrutiny from reporters and fans.
    • But Dunloe's share price has bucked the trend, up 39% since January 1 and up by 65% over the year.
    • This must be what they meant by not bucking the market.
    • But Keighley is bucking the trend, especially by maintaining engineering manufacturing levels, in contrast to the slump in manufacturing in the rest of the country over the period of the Labour Government.
    • Which means now is the perfect time to buck the trend and get in while the market is at a pricing low.
    • But, as I explained here and especially here, the stock market is bucking some fairly powerful deflationary currents, in both the the U.S. and the global economies.
    • While the number of people participating in more traditional forms of organised sport continues to decline, this trend is being bucked in dramatic style by the level of interest in the many new events that veer from the mainstream.
    • But despite the market hurdles they face, some small brewers are bucking the trend.
    • It closed its first day of trading at 37 cents a share and has bucked a trend afflicting other new listings by rising to 41 cents as of the April 12 market close.
    • However sales of MG models were up 10% to 9,540 - bucking the market trend which saw overall sales down by more than 7%.
    • Scottish Equity Partners, the Glasgow-based independent venture capital company, is bucking the market trend by expanding both its Glasgow and London offices.
    • But Google, until today, surprised many by bucking the market trends for so long.
    • Three debutants on Hong Kong bourses bucked the general market trend yesterday that saw the Hang Seng Index plunge for a second day to end down 1.5 per cent.
    • The gold shares bucked the general trend today and closed on or near their highs with the South Africans firmer due to the softening rand.
    • So, does it make more sense to bet on gold shares to start bucking this trend again - or is it better to jump on the bandwagon and do as the Chinese do?
    • In those ten years the research centre had helped Smith and Nephew to become much more profitable and has grown in stature - and in share price which bucked the recent downward stock market trend to end 2.5 times higher than a decade ago.
    • However, the one market niche bucking the downward trend this year has been that catering for first-time buyers.
    • Prices at the top end of the central-London market continue to rise slightly, bucking the national trend.

adjective

informal
US
  • 1

    (before noun) raso
    • Like the old buck sergeant he is, Shipley hurried them off to the appropriate ticket agent.
    • In 1954, I became a Ph.D. in mathematics and a buck private in the Army.
    • Pat Reid was buck private to begin with and, even though he was in charge of an important group, he remained a buck private until the day he left Spain.
    • I was a buck private, private first class, sergeant, staff sergeant, first sergeant, and then I became a second lieutenant.

There are 3 main translations of buck in Spanish

: buck1buck2buck3

buck2

dólar, n.

Pronunciation /bək/ /bʌk/

noun

informal
US
  • 1

    (dollar)
    dólar masculine
    verde masculine Latin America informal
    • I know, but it's just five bucks, and at this point I'm almost eager to give it to him.
    • Can you imagine paying 47 bucks to watch skateboarding?
    • It was only about 8 euros, which is about US 10 bucks.
    • Now, how could he turn a few bucks out of this deal?
    • Sure, you can stay home, save a few bucks and see the game on TV, but what's the fun in that?
    • They claim they're going to save a few hundred million bucks in the deal.
    • They range in price from several dollars to around twenty-five bucks.
    • They will get a $2,500 pay increase, and they will get to keep five bucks.
    • If you don't want a full meal, you can get roti bread with satay sauce for five bucks.
    • I saved up and bought it at the local pawnshop for seventy-five bucks, a deal as far as I was concerned.
    • Men in business suits would leave me a buck on a fifty dollar tab.
    • It's a $20.00 registration plus Green fees of about five bucks.
    • The girl gave him a whole fifty bucks and received three dollars change.
    • I just bought a Liz Claiborne sweater at Goodwill for five bucks.
    • Spree somehow convinced the Knicks to reduce his fine from 150,000 dollars to just 2,500 bucks…
    • This is a bit of a side note but five bucks says the town of Greenville isn't green at all.
    • Maybe just two bucks for a soda or five bucks for a beer, but that's still money I don't have.
    • Pay me five thousand bucks and I'll speak at your corporate function.
    • I was sitting at the bar, having a couple of quiet ones with a bloke I know only distantly, when a voice behind me said ‘Lend us five bucks.’
    • Surely they would have no problem forking out a few extra bucks for a DVD player.

There are 3 main translations of buck in Spanish

: buck1buck2buck3

buck3

Pronunciation /bək/ /bʌk/

noun

  • 1