Hay 2 traducciones principales de count en Español

: count1count2

count1

recuento, n.

Pronunciación /kaʊnt/

Ver definición en Español de recuento

nombre

  • 1

    • 1.1(act of counting)

      recuento masculino
      cómputo masculino
      (of votes) escrutinio masculino
      (of votes) recuento masculino
      (of votes) cómputo masculino
      (of votes) conteo masculino Andes, Venezuela
      (in boxing) cuenta femenino
      (in boxing) conteo masculino Andes, Venezuela
      to make a count of sth hacer un recuento de algo
      • to do a count of sth hacer un recuento de algo
      • at the last count en el último recuento
      • hold your breath for a count of five aguanta hasta cinco sin respirar
      • we'll begin on the count of four a los cuatro empezamos
      • Without picking up the count, the referee ended the fight.
      • Referee Tony Perez reached five in the count and the bell couldn't save Ellis.
      • How many fighters could have gotten to their feet before the count of ten after catching Joe Frazier's full swing left hook flush on the jaw?
      • The count had only reached four before the referee decided he had seen enough and summoned immediate medical attention.
      • Harvey, who had won five of his seven previous fights, took an eight count, and having felt Symonds' power resorted to holding for survival and was warned by the referee.
      • Despite losing the election, Sinn Fein's Colm Burns was in buoyant mood, pointing to the fact he topped the polls at the first count.
      • I opened up every document, did a word count, and added it all up.
      • I got everyone into two rows and did a count to make sure everyone was all right.
      • If it's not close, between the exit polls and the early counts, we could have an idea even as early as tonight or tomorrow morning.
      • Also, at the last count, you guys donated a whopping $27,695.41 to the relief fund.
      • I've been trying to do a mental count and it seems like there are five pecan trees on the west side, three in the backyard, and two on the east.
      • To determine whether the child is receiving enough food, the doctor will do a calorie count after asking the parents what the child eats every day.
      • I have been overwhelmed by the number of people who have written, at least 50 at the last count.
      • The party faces further losses at the polls tomorrow when the counts begin for the local government elections, which were held on the same day as the general election.
      • At the last count, around 60% of individual bankrupts were under 30.
      • Mat did a quick count and decided there were somewhere between thirty and forty people in this room.
      • He was also pretty active in his family life, fathering sixteen children and, at the last count, he was a grandfather thirty-three times!
      • At the last count, more than £920 had been banked and there was more than £100 in loose change waiting to be bagged up.
      • It's easy to imagine him presiding over a high-powered business meetings - he owned 13 companies at the last count - in jeans and open-necked shirt.
      • The books sell in their millions - 42 million at the last count; in Britain he outsells Stephen King to be the country's number one horror writer.
      • She said in 1992 there were 336 acute care beds in the hospital and at the last count there were 187.
      • When they proceeded to the count, it turned out that there were 970 votes for Mr. Yushchenko and 383 votes for Yanukovych.
      • The non-party councillor got 1790 votes and was elected on the first count having exceeded the quota by 690 votes.
      • Last year the same amendment failed after a quorum count showed that the number of students had dropped from 550 to 430.
      • He won just over 2,000 votes but, with less than 4% of the total poll, was eliminated after the fourth count.

    • 1.2(total)

      total masculino
      the final count el recuento / cómputo final
      • the body count has risen to 40 el número total de víctimas ha ascendido a 40
      • The film has a much higher body count than the first, but the deaths are a bit less chilling here.
      • But even as he was speaking, the body count was rising.
      • The main goal of the meeting was to pass an amendment to lower the quorum count to 200.
      • With electronic voting, the computer will take less than 20 minutes to calculate the poll, total valid poll, quota, all the counts and the winners.
      • The death count, the death toll officially won't be known for still more days and weeks to come, Lou.
      • Last November, the discrepancy between the presidential exit polls and the tallied count was far beyond the margin for error.
      • Spencer, who scored two tries, topped the tackle count with a huge tally of 34.
      • The official death count stands at just over 1,800.
      • We also list published chromosome numbers (diploid counts only) for each group.
      • White cell counts among the patients who have died have been up to 10 times greater than is normally seen with serious infections.
      • Gloucester, whose injury count has hit double figures, featured Forrester in the centres again and a patched-up back row.
      • The leader in the general classification is based on a running count of each rider's cumulative time over the race's 21 individual legs.
      • Most patients had platelet counts of less than 20,000 per mm3.
      • All these factors can cause not only low counts, zero counts, and immotile sperms that lead to infertility, but also cancers in some cases.
      • Twenty-four percent of patients had platelet counts above the upper range of normal.
      • Three patients had low platelet counts before discharge from the first hospitalization.
      • Most of the patients had a parasite count of more than 10 percent, which is critical.
      • It was only men with fertility problems who had lower counts and counts vary widely anyhow.
      • No matter how many times we totted it up, the chromosome count never rose above 46 (with a bit missing if you were a man).
      • Finally, the number of shoots and plantlets was counted again and summed with the first counts to give the total regeneration.

  • 2

    (particular, point)
    to be found guilty on all counts ser declarado culpable de todos los cargos
    • they're right on the first count en el primer punto tienen razón
    • it's been praised/criticized on several counts ha sido elogiado/criticado por varios motivos / por varias razones
    • it aims to entertain and inform and it fails on both counts se propone divertir e informar y no logra ninguno de los dos cometidos

verbo transitivo

  • 1

    (enumerate, add up)
    contar
    • The percentage of infected cells was determined by counting the total number infected and uninfected cells from 10 randomly selected microscopic fields.
    • When Krohn raised concerns over this lack of accountability, he was told that it would take too long to count the collection and distribution of all the money.
    • We collected fruits and counted the total number of flowers, fruits, and fully developed undamaged seeds from each plant.
    • If you get less than 35, you left some combinations out, or if you get more than 35, you counted some combinations more than once.
    • The loose change was counted up yesterday at the Sainsbury's store in Vauxhall, south London, using a machine which counts up to 600 coins a minute.
    • The votes will be counted up to Monday, July 28 and the election is being overseen by the Electoral Reform Society.
    • And the funds raised by the swimming marathon have just been counted up.
    • The membership total is tallied by counting the number of people who have paid dues in the last 18 months.
    • The first census in 1769 counted a total of 797,584 people; by 1998, the total population was 5,294,860.
    • The total raw score was then determined by counting the number of different feasible uses generated for all three objects.
    • Total words for a specific item were determined by counting each word in the problem statement and all answer choices.
    • The vote was anonymous and we all watched as it was counted up.
    • The final mark includes both the test results, as well as assessment task results, which are counted up over the year.
    • The votes were counted up fairly quickly, and by a slim majority one of the three choices had been passed.
    • Votes are counted locally but the totals are calculated nationally, and seats in parliament are awarded in proportion to votes.
    • Each player then counts the total number of cards they have collected in their pile.
    • Across the country thousands upon thousands of polling stations are closing and votes are beginning to be counted to determine the new rulers of the country.
    • The remaining stones were counted to determine the number of dead, then placed in a great heap in remembrance of those who died in battle.
    • Meanwhile local governments began to count the total losses resulting from the flash flood.
    • So, in February, I've decided to count the total number of search engine referrals to this webpage.
    • Her eyes were squeezed shut, gritting her teeth so hard her jaw ached, attempting to count to ten in order to help calm herself down.
    • At one point I could calculate the calorie, fat and carbohydrate content of a fully laden buffet table in my head, even though I normally can't count to 20 without taking off my shoes.
    • He claimed to be able to count to 100 now, although I didn't put it to the test…
    • When he was finished, he told the boy to count to 10.
    • Let me count to ten, upload, and go watch a stupid movie.
    • You might need to learn how to count to 10 before you speak - or maybe even 11 or 12!
    • My customary answer is to count to fifty and then, after confirming that nobody knows or cares that I'm still on the line, I hang up.
    • Having made a century flawlessly, she asked me ‘Can you count to a hundred?’
    • You made it this far without knowing how to count to nine?
    • She seemed to count to 10, her smile fixed, then said she'd have to ask.
    • They couldn't speak any English, and Matt knew only how to count to ten in Arabic.
    • He can actually count to ten, but gets rather carried away.
    • Lin comprehended pairs, and could count to four, so eight was as high as his knowledge of cardinal numbering went.
    • Numbers were practically meaningless to her, as she only barely could count to 100, something Laurel constantly nagged her about.
    • It took him almost an hour to count to twenty-two.
    • They began to count to three, then sang a ‘lovely’ happy birthday.
    • He could already count to fifty, and he had taught himself!
    • He can count from 1 to 10, and recite the alphabet from A-Z.
    • When asked to count backward from 67 to 54, he counted from 62 to 52.
    • Bob still claims that Billy can't count and Billy says otherwise.
  • 2

    (include)
    contar
    there were six of them, not counting the driver eran seis, sin contar al conductor
    • there'll be fourteen of us, counting you and me seremos catorce, tú y yo incluidos
    • Expect the form to be widely adopted, since its sponsors include the VHA Health Foundation, which counts major hospitals among its members.
    • His total payout will top $20 million, not counting his pension!
    • In these reports, only discharge events are counted and cannot account for individuals with repeat admissions.
    • She even counts a former president among her followers.
    • No extras are included, unless you count the advertisement for other Comedy Central shows.
    • His first novel has moved somewhere in the area of 20 million copies - and that's not counting the millions of black-market editions sold in copyright-flouting countries.
    • Again, certain categories of fatalities are not counted, including deaths caused by industrial diseases.
    • However, these figures count all officers, including desk officers who are not able to answer calls from the public.
    • Though she counts Chinese and Russian among the languages she speaks fluently, Fritzie has never played piano in either of those countries.
    • The university does not count a year that includes six months or more of medical or family leave as a year toward mandatory tenure review.
    • For I counted him among the many friends I had gained during five years as a journalist in Jammu and Kashmir.
    • The NT $25 billion budget would not be counted and included under the Public Debt Law, according to the draft proposal.
    • RIM, which counts the Yorkshire Post among its titles, already owns Insider's English sister publications North West Insider and Yorkshire Insider.
    • The group, which counts actress Joanna Lumley among its fans, is currently based at Carlisle Business Centre, Manningham.
    • Some of the tales told against him by fellow touring pros were spiteful, but without doubt he would be counted among the top five British sportsmen in any era.
    • I count Euripides among them, and would also include in this category Aristotle, Rousseau, Hume, and Adam Smith.
    • Though she was agoraphobic, she had a broad scattering of acquaintances, including a loyal readership who counted her among their friends.
    • The government's communications unit has approved ads worth just under $1 billion since 1996, without counting individual departments' spending.
    • The journey north-east from Niamey to Agadez would take at least 12 hours of driving - without counting the stops.
  • 3

    (consider)
    considerar
    to count oneself lucky/fortunate considerarse afortunado
    • to count sb among one's friends contar a algn entre sus (or mis etc.) amigos
    • Buckley, a 24-year-old schoolteacher, has Irish ancestry so is not counted as an overseas player, meaning the club still have the quota option open to them.
    • 2004, therefore, has to be counted as a shocking disappointment.
    • Why should money transfers like these be counted as aid?
    • I've no time for them at all and I am happy to stand and be counted as a Labour supporter.
    • At least in the insurance sector, destruction caused by riots is counted as an act of god.
    • To count the accumulation of ‘merely’ a dozen Olympic medals as a disappointment is silly.
    • These families often face material hardships and financial pressures similar to those families who are officially counted as poor.
    • Yes, both have their flaws, but as Pittsburgh's first experience of the Ring cycle, I think it has to be counted as a stunning success.
    • Even though Scholes sometimes plays in a follow-up role to the attackers, he's still counted as a midfielder.
    • And any other form of reading or writing - such as the letters to the fairies we have been writing - can be counted as homework instead.
    • We also have to re-define work, so that the work of caring for children and doing human maintenance in the home is counted as productive work, has attributed value.
    • According to the man who has yet to record a meaningful victory - the Far East tour and the bounce match against Dundee United cannot be counted as meaningful - playtime is over.
    • Beer consumption has gone down by 20 per cent over 20 years, even if lager is counted as beer - which, officially, it is.
    • Four Summerhill students can count themselves among the brightest in the country after winning the All-Ireland Schools Table Quiz title.
    • I counted myself fortunate that the film only ran 84 minutes, since only about ten of them were interesting.
    • Our football clubs and national teams win nothing internationally, and yet we say we want to be counted among the best.
    • How ironic that while 20-year-olds are counted as kids when it comes to drinking, an increasing number of kids only just into their teens are being tried as adults in the justice system.
    • He counts himself lucky that his parents, delighted he wanted to write, bought him a typewriter when he was 14.
    • The US - well, some of it - argued that the Backfire could be counted as an intercontinental-range aircraft and hence part of the strategic balance.
    • If you are a public servant and have one of what are widely agreed to be the best pensions in the country - count yourself lucky.

verbo intransitivo

  • 1

    (enumerate)
    contar
    can't you count? ¿(es que) no sabes contar?
    • I counted (up) to ninety-two conté hasta noventa y dos
    • to count in tens contar de diez en diez
    • counting from Tuesday a partir del martes
  • 2

    • 2.1(be valid)

      contar
      that doesn't count eso no cuenta / no vale
      • Logically, in a ‘normal’ election, governance issues should count significantly.
      • Critics' views count only when they echo the public's, she says.
      • When it mattered, when it counted, you were there, and that's what should count.
      • Perhaps all columnists have to persuade themselves that they count, that they matter, that they are agents of history, whispering words of wisdom into the ear of the history makers.
      • It is not Jesus' Resurrection that counts but the way in which the disciples experienced the significance of Jesus' Resurrection.
      • On a team whose season was sabotaged by injuries, with nearly every regular out for significant time, that counts.
      • Whose interpretations of the world will count at this critical moment?
      • It is, after all, the subject matter that counts - this group of people in this place at this time.
      • It's not what or how you believe that counts; it only matters that you do believe.
      • No one significant so my opinion of him doesn't really count, now does it?
      • You know you're going to lose ultimately, you know you're going to make decisions that you regret, but it's how you carry yourself throughout that counts.
      • We thought, ‘What we need to do is turn the critics around, because the fans don't count.’
      • As an amateur in the field, but with a job to do, I do not think it is really the subject matter that counts.
      • It's the thought that counts on Mother's Day, when a box of chocolates and a card means so much to most mums.
      • Finally, the man told the woman to express her opinion where it counts, at the ballot box.
      • His girlfriend liked the way he looked, and Mike felt that hers was the only opinion that counted.
      • She believed in him and she was not a frivolous person, so her opinion counted.
      • But I understand that other people's opinions count just as much as mine.
      • They often question whether their opinions count or if the issue is of relevance to them.
      • Patil emphasised that as far as he was concerned, what counted was the consistency factor.

    • 2.2(matter)

      contar
      every minute counts cada minuto cuenta
      • every penny counts muchos pocos hacen un mucho
      • he doesn't have too many friends who count no tiene muchos amigos de peso

Hay 2 traducciones principales de count en Español

: count1count2

count2

conde, n.

Pronunciación /kaʊnt/

nombre

  • 1

    (rank)
    conde masculino
    Count Dracula el conde Drácula
    • They all sat in a row, ranged according to their rank - kings and princes and dukes and earls and counts and barons and knights.
    • Similarly, the authority of marquesses, dukes, earls, barons, counts, and other nobles had long existed side by side with royal and imperial authority.
    • The official guest list named at least 70 kings, queens, grand dukes, princes, counts and lesser nobles.
    • In 1808 the imperial nobility was completed with the ranks of count, baron, and chevalier, all of them hereditary.
    • Lords and dukes and counts came up to me in an endless line, bowing and asking for a dance.
    • She was also introduced to several lords, dukes and soon to be counts and barons, who were her age.
    • He directed the call to arms not to kings and emperors, but to counts and barons and even to cities.
    • They had been introduced to most of the guests at the ball, the counts and countesses, princes and princesses, kings and queens.
    • These families of counts and marquises proved long-lived, and over time played important roles in different regional and urban contexts.
    • Cities are torn by wars between local crime lords, and nations are rent by various dukes and counts dealing death.
    • Along the way, he told her who would be there; counts, countesses, her new maids and staff, and, of course, his parents, the King and Queen.
    • But as the children of the counts and countesses grew up, many needed to raise money.
    • At least with Philip's reign, the trend of the previous generations was halted: the crown at least was no longer losing lands to counts and dukes.
    • The Venetian republic forbade its citizen nobles (those who sat in the Consiglio Maggiore) from assuming titles such as prince, duke, marquis, or count.
    • A council meeting that contained dukes, counts, and generals.
    • Just pretend you're dukes or counts from one of the northern countries and you can get anywhere in that castle.
    • A number of counts and other lords came with their forces, but the most significant and influential arrival was Cardinal Pelagius, a papal legate.
    • In the meantime, Araminte's family has proposed a marriage between her and a neighbouring count in order to settle a land dispute.
    • The count was giving orders to some servants and when he heard her he turned around.
    • As the night drew on the count ordered everyone to bed as he had done the previous night.