There are 2 main translations of crow in Spanish

: crow1crow2

crow1

cuervo, n.

Pronunciation /kroʊ/ /krəʊ/

noun

Zoology
  • 1

    cuervo masculine
    • He said the proliferation of Corvids birds like grey crows, magpies and rooks could be directly linked to the decline in songbirds in the area.
    • Large black birds like crows and grackles are often referred to as trash birds.
    • We mostly saw the usual sparrows, doves, crows, chickadees, and titmice. Tons of Blue Jay are in flight right now as they are involved in a migration of their own.
    • The corvids of North America consist of one species of jackdaw, four crows, two ravens, one nutcracker, two magpies, and ten species of jays.
    • Great Horned Owls do not build their own nests, but use nests built by hawks, crows, magpies, herons, or other large birds.
    • The airport attracts corvids, rooks, crows, lapwings and wood pigeons among others.
    • The corvines - crows, rooks, jays, magpies and jackdaws - are relentless stealers of other birds' eggs and chicks.
    • Birds - blackbirds and thrushes, robins, starlings, rooks and crows, jays, ducks, seagulls and owls will eat slugs
    • Eagles, vultures, penguins, ravens, crows, doves, and ostriches are just a few of the birds that do double time as species and symbols.
    • The brain-to-body ratio of crows, ravens and magpies equals that of dolphins and nearly matches humans.
    • At nesting time the parents become bold and pugnacious attacking crows, magpies, cuckoos and kestrels crossing their territory.
    • But periods of high heat and drought send such common urban-dwelling species as crows, blue jays and robins out of the city in search of fresh water.
    • Birds such as grouse, crows, quail, partridge, nightjars, cuckoos, shrikes, larks, pipits, merlins, harriers, kestrels and buzzards would all have been seen.
    • The virus is primarily a disease of wild birds, particularly crows, blue jays, and birds of prey, and is transmitted by mosquitoes to horses and humans.
    • It had long been used in Europe to kill predators and ‘noxious’ birds such as crows and magpies.
    • It is the habit of crows to perch like sentinels on the tops of isolated trees, where they can see what is going on in all directions.
    • Indeed, just now there are too many acorns for even such greedy birds as crows and magpies.
    • Losses occur, however, when the unattended eggs are taken by crows or ravens, or when nesting birds are disturbed by humans.
    • Blue jays and crows rob smaller birds' nests, often those of robins and catbirds, of both eggs and young, while hawks may steal the same from the crows and jays!
    • Just now the skies are busy with birds; rooks and crows grouping and re-grouping in ragged formation, starlings showing off their flock skills, and swifts silver-arrowing round and round.

There are 2 main translations of crow in Spanish

: crow1crow2

crow2

cacareo, n.

Pronunciation /kroʊ/ /krəʊ/

noun

  • 1

    (cry)
    (of rooster) cacareo masculine
    (of baby) gorjeo masculine
    (of adult) alarido masculine
    (of adult) grito masculine
    • Beware of the bark of a dog or crow of a cock at night, for they signify death.
    • I am up like the cock's crow on Wednesdays to get ready for the bus, which picks me up at my door.
    • Following sunrise comes the clanging sound of scores of church bells, coupled with the crow of roosters from the adjacent Moslem Quarter.

intransitive verb crowed, crowed, crew

  • 1

    (cock) cacarear
    • Funny, I thought normal roosters crowed in the morning.
    • When the rooster crowed to greet the morning, Ben thought he sounded awfully close by but to find the fowl on the foot of his bed was closer than he thought!
    • Here you can see women washing clothes in the river, children chasing each other in narrow lanes, chickens crowing and dogs barking at strangers.
    • Flies buzzed, cockerels crowed, goats bleated and a chorus of dogs was howling furiously.
    • The cold wind swept the dawn, and the roosters crowed at a distance.
    • By dawn, mysterious roosters would crow but never show themselves.
    • At the ranch the roosters started crowing at 4am just a few feet from my head, shocking me to consciousness.
    • She could hear about two, no, three different roosters crowing, sunlight just barely peeking through her window.
    • The morning greeted us with an early sun rise, the village rooster crowing and the swish of a broom sweeping the sand court yard outside.
    • Instead of alarm clocks, there is a rooster crowing on a rooftop nearby.
    • ‘This is a village that never sleeps,’ she said, as a rooster crowed in the background.
    • Every once in a while a dog barked or a rooster crowed.
    • As dawn approaches and the light level rises, you will hear roosters crowing and the night ambient sounds will die away.
    • We always awoke to the sound of a cock crowing or a bird chirping and when we looked outside, we saw nature in all of her morning glory!
    • There are dozens of young hares running about aimlessly in the fields while young cock pheasants are crowing their heads off in every garden and potato patch.
    • In both traditions the white rooster, which crows at dawn to dispel the darkness of night, is highly esteemed.
    • When we first got them, Bill and I spent many a morning lying in bed, laughing after having been awakened by our young rooster's attempts at crowing.
    • The loony rooster next door insists on crowing at all hours.
    • Finally a rooster flew to the top and decided to crow around midnight.
    • The rooster crowed, as if it wanted more scraps of food to eat.
  • 2

    (baby) gorjear
  • 3

    (boast, exult)
    alardear
    pavonearse
    to crow about/over sth alardear / jactarse de algo
    • She will crow in delight when she spots either one of them.
    • In fact, he's crowing and preening in the spotlight that he's brought to bear on his actions.
    • You had to dig nuggets out from him about his career because he hated it to seem as if he was crowing but this was one incident he would talk about.
    • He was crowing with joy because he had run 8 miles yesterday as opposed to my paltry one quarter.
    • My normal, nice, reserved Captain and partner was crowing.
    • She literally crowed with pleasure, declaring that now she understood my political blindness.
    • William crowed as he jumped and caught the flying Frisbee before Becky's teammate.
    • Perhaps you'll even crow when his shoelaces get caught in the escalator.

transitive verb crowed, crowed

  • 1

    alardear
    I told you so, he crowed —te lo dije —alardeó