There are 2 main translations of rocket in Spanish

: rocket1rocket2

rocket1

cohete espacial, n.

Pronunciation /ˈrɑkət/ /ˈrɒkɪt/

noun

  • 1

    (spacecraft)
    cohete espacial masculine
    rocket attack ataque con cohetes
    • At the start of World War II, he entered the Royal navy and served with distinction on mine sweepers, destroyers, and rocket launchers.
    • Helping the scientists with their endeavor is a group of astronauts tooling around in their high-tech rocket ship, led by space-stud Katsuo.
    • Many are heavily armed, while others must've arrived late the day that they were handing out rocket launchers.
    • After some scenes of preparing for the next launch, we see the lift-off as well, sticking with the shuttle well past the separation of the solid rocket boosters.
    • The rocket crash results in much wartime symbolism, with locals rallying around an old woman who stoically accepts the demolition of her house.
    • The payload, perched on the nose cone of the massive rocket, was a one-man exploration vessel, Ranger 3.
    • In the background, a rocket ship shoots upward from the horizon.
    • When he wrote the novel, there was no such thing as a rocket ship, and no one had ever gone to the moon.
    • Would it not be easy to find numerous youths to fly to the moon in a rocket plane if the opportunity were offered?
    • Perchlorate is the substance that has served since the 1940s as an oxidizer in solid rocket fuel for more effective propulsion for space shuttles and missiles.
    • Having stolen an interstellar rocket and propelled himself into orbit, he is now moments away from asphyxiation as his oxygen runs low.
    • During their now almost-forgotten recent war, the weavers created a body of work which showed the full panoply of modern warfare - guns, grenades, tanks, helicopters, jet planes, rockets and bombs.
    • The horizon glows red, and they can see rockets being fired.
    • Another rocket is fired, and the smoke hangs ominously over the square.
    • Silver has worked on no less than 50 films, most of them featuring people being shot with rockets and expensive cars blowing up.
    • Sujatha, in his preface, reminds us that science fiction need not necessarily be concerned with rockets and space odysseys.
    • The only images were of war, of bombings and rockets.
    • The convoy was comprised of dozens of vehicles transporting long-range artillery rockets.
    • Each missile contained 44 kg of high explosives and 498 kg of rocket fuel.
  • 2

    (missile)
    cohete masculine
    misil masculine
    • The famed Brooklyn amusement park is a recurring motif in these paintings that feature carousel horses, Ferris wheels, fireworks, rockets and extravagant fantasy architecture.
    • He spent his summer vacation collaborating with scientists on a project involving launching small rockets into storm clouds above a desolate region to trigger lightning bolts.
    • Will this bizarre heist sizzle like a bottle rocket or fizzle like a defective firecracker?
    • The finale began with a rocket that symbolically extinguished the Olympic flame.
    • The fiesta opens with an explosion of rockets that look to Jake like shrapnel bursts; fiesta time is comparable to wartime, Bill says.
    • Friday night was spent huddled around the fire, launching bottle rockets and roman candles at each other.
    • We lit off so many bottle rockets and firecrackers that we had the girls running for cover.
  • 3

    (engine)
    cohete masculine
    • The rocket motor ignites following discharge from the cannon and extends the effective range of the cannon.
    • However, the propulsion device of a rocket can be called either a rocket motor or a rocket engine, and usage here seems not to have settled on one or the other.
    • While many of these technologies may seem like science fiction, so too were the jet engine, the airplane, and the rocket engine only 100 years ago.
    • Augmented with an off-the-shelf rocket motor, Paveway II also became the basis for the navy's Skipper II air-to-surface missile.
    • The main concern was for the still unaccounted for Cockpit Escape Module containing a large rocket motor.
    • Milliseconds later powerful rams lifted the pod six inches, then its rocket motor ignited with a roar, boosting me at a crushing 11g on a slightly forward trajectory.
    • The spaceship then drops into gliding flight and fires its rocket motor while climbing steeply for more than a minute, reaching a speed of 2,500 mph.
    • Once it is dropped off, a rocket motor will fire for about 80 seconds, accelerating the vehicle to Mach 3 in a vertical climb.
    • Even the pilot's seat is explosive, because it contains a rocket motor to eject the seat and pilot in an emergency.
    • The pilot then fires the rocket motor for 80 seconds and pulls into a vertical climb.
    • They got off to an early start by test-firing a powerful rocket engine for almost three minutes - long enough to boost 1,500 pounds into orbit.
    • Nasa issued a contract in October 1962 that provided for the research and development of a nuclear-powered rocket engine.
    • At this hour, Mission Control has fired up the rocket engine on a supply ship attached to Mir for the second of what will be three burns.
    • The glide and end-game maneuverability are achieved without the added weight, cost and complexity of a rocket motor.
    • A missile catapulted from the Columbia's missile tube and fired its rocket motor.
    • The rocket ignites, the boot pinwheels, the flare sputters and then quickly dies.
    • The process of washing perchlorate out of rockets has been a source of drinking and irrigation water contamination demonstrated in and around the Colorado River and the Sacramento area.
    • By going on from the German V - 1 and V - 2 experiments, it was feasible to believe rockets big enough to lift a spacecraft into orbit now might be constructed.
    • The operator signals the initiation of the launch sequence and the small booster rocket is ignited.
    • The launching rockets were mainly used to place government spacecraft into Earth orbit or towards the Moon or other planets.
  • 4

    (firework)
    cohete masculine
    volador masculine
    cuete masculine Latin America

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (rise)
    (price) dispararse
    (price) ponerse por las nubes
    she rocketed to stardom se convirtió en una estrella / llegó al estrellato de la noche a la mañana
    • In 2004, the box office take had rocketed to £74.5m, of which Russian films accounted for 12%.
    • Agents in Santa Clara County say sales are rocketing.
    • When the Fed raised rates another 75 basis points in early 2000, spreads were rocketing to historic highs.
    • Sales in the UK, however, have rocketed from 156 million in 2001 to 176 million last year.
    • The Canadian dollar had rocketed to 86 cents U.S.
    • The technology industries began to veer to a crash and unemployment rocketed.
    • The company saw its milk sales rocket from 600,000 cartons to 4.2 million bottles weekly.
    • Insurance premiums could rocket, but public liability insurance is a must for anyone who keeps livestock.
    • He sponsors the project and watches the costs rocket to over a million above the original budget.
    • Considering its limited funds in a time of rocketing prices for art, the museum has succeeded well in its aim of broad coverage.
    • With a healthy balance sheet and rocketing attendance figures, the theatre company is beginning a new £1 / 2 million production of Romeo and Juliet and a record breaking programme of one act works.
    • The dark clouds of 30 years have parted to reveal rocketing educational levels and unemployment as almost a thing of the past.
    • The hostages are forced to endure bombs being wired over their heads, random shootings, and rocketing temperatures in a school gymnasium without any water.
    • Spain, where housing prices have rocketed up 150 % since 1997, also has analysts concerned.
    • In the month following the riots, violent crime of all kinds rocketed up 20 percent.
    • Sales rocketed 49 per cent to US $4.4 billion from US $3 billion.
    • House prices in Southampton have rocketed by 136 per cent between 1995 and 2003.
    • House prices are rocketing and there is a particular need for affordable dwellings.
    • While per capita consumption in the EU is declining consumption in Ireland is rocketing ahead.
    • But three particular cases sent the repair bill rocketing for October 2001 to September 2002.
  • 2rocketing present participle

    (inflation) galopante
    rocketing prices precios que se disparan / que suben vertiginosamente
  • 3

    (move rapidly)
    the truck rocketed past el camión pasó como una bala / como un bólido

transitive verb

  • 1

    the movie rocketed him to stardom la película lo lanzó al estrellato

There are 2 main translations of rocket in Spanish

: rocket1rocket2

rocket2

rúcula, n.

Pronunciation /ˈrɑkət/ /ˈrɒkɪt/

noun

Botany
  • 1

    rúcula feminine
    rucola feminine
    oruga feminine